Pathology 101: How a pathology report explains cancer

Pathology reports on suspected cancer say if a patient has a malignancy, type of cancer and if it has spread

mammary carcinoma

In a pathology report, the diagnosis section provides the location of the tumor, its type and grade, and size.

 

Chances are, the treatment plan for your cancer was determined by the results on a pathology report. Before your diagnosis, you probably had a biopsy or surgery where a doctor removed cells or tissue for study under a microscope. Specialists called pathologists spend their days viewing these samples, understanding how they look compared to normal cells and preparing reports which summarize the findings on each biopsy for oncologists and surgeons.

We spoke with Cancer Center pathologist, Celina Kleer, M.D., director of the Breast Pathology Division in the Department of Pathology,to find out the information contained in a report and how your oncologist uses it to decide the best course of treatment for your cancer. Continue reading

Singer relies on positive attitude, U-M team after palate cancer diagnosis

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After being diagnosed with cancers of the palate and thyroid one after another, professional singer Jerry Garcia knew he was going to have to risk his career in order to save his health and family life.

With surgery recommended for both tumors, Garcia knew at every turn that he might have to take his musical ministry in another direction if surgical complications made him no longer able to sing in the caliber he’d built a career on. Instead, Jerry credits the quality of his recent album – he calls it the best he’s ever sung – to the surgeries and experts he saw at the U-M Health System.

“I came out of this unscathed with no vocal cord damage whatsoever,” Garcia said. “It’s the power of a strong positive attitude.”

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Nausea and vomiting, side effects of cancer treatment

nausea and vomitingNausea and vomiting are always distressing. They are a dreaded side effect for many undergoing cancer treatment. As an oncology nurse that has administered chemotherapy, I’ve witnessed firsthand how troublesome they can be for patients.

Nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy, commonly called chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting or CINV, can affect as many as 50% of patients. Treatment for these two symptoms has improved over the years with better medications. However, these twin side effects to cancer treatment still remain a barrier to quality of life. Continue reading

Men with prostate cancer can now find support

All patients - not just U-M patients - can join new support group

ProstateSupport

A new support group for prostate cancer patients and families starts Wednesday, Oct. 7 in partnership with the Cancer Support Community of Greater Ann Arbor.

 

mCancerPartner sat down recently with Ganesh Palapattu, M.D., to discuss a new support group for prostate cancer patients and families that is offered in partnership with the Cancer Support Community of Greater Ann Arbor. Dr. Palapattu is a urologic cancer surgeon and scientist who is co-director of the Cancer Center’s Prostate Cancer program and the High Risk Prostate Cancer Clinic.

mCancerPartner: How can a support group like this benefit prostate cancer patients? Continue reading

Calling out to breast cancer survivors

A chance for you to help improve breast cancer care

breast cancer survivorsLast year, the Cancer AnswerLine ™ nurses had the opportunity to start working with the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center’s Breast Cancer and Advocacy Committee. When I attended my first meeting with this group, I was pleasantly surprised. I had a pre-conceived notion this would be a group of women working on a smaller scale like hosting bake sales to raise money for breast cancer. Instead, I found that this group of smart women has really made an impact on breast cancer treatment. They are currently looking for new members. Continue reading

Safe handling at home of medications and waste

safe handlingWhether your cancer treatment is oral or intravenous, some medications may be harmful to those who live with you. Limiting exposure of other people to your pills and body fluids is your best bet to keeping everyone safe, even if the effect would be minimal.

Keeping prescription medication away from others sounds simple, but cancer therapy can be complex. Here are some general tips to ensure a safe home environment: Continue reading