You’re invited to a garden party celebrating women’s health!

women's healthThe Community Outreach Program of the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center has teamed up with the Ann Arbor chapter of The Links, Inc., for a Garden Party celebrating women’s health. This free event takes place Sunday, July 19 from 2:30-4:30 p.m. at the Matthaei Botanical Gardens in Ann Arbor.

Guest speakers include:

  • Sofia Merajver, M.D., Ph.D., of the U-M Breast and Ovarian Risk Evaluation Clinic
  • Aisha Langford, Ph.D., MPH, who will speak on cancer prevention
  • Colleen Greene, senior wellness coordinator at MHealthy, who will speak on what physical activity can do for you.

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Sexual function after prostate cancer treatment: don’t be afraid to ask!

sexual function after prostate cancerWhether patients undergo surgery, hormonal therapy, or radiation therapy as active treatment of prostate cancer, all can have treatment-related sexual side effects. As many as 20% to 80% of men can expect to experience some disruptions to their usual sexual function after prostate cancer treatment, which can include changes in sex drive, erections or orgasms.

The good news is these changes to a man’s sex life, while common, can be managed with the appropriate education and resources. Men should expect that their sexual function will be affected. They will have to make some accommodations in their sexual experiences and relationships but no one has to give up their sex life as a condition of managing prostate cancer. Continue reading

Breast density and breast cancer risk

breast density

In Michigan, a new law went into effect on June 1 requiring that mammography service providers inform patients if they have dense breast tissue on screening mammography. Michigan is the 23rd state to enact a law like this. So what exactly is breast density and what does it mean if you have dense breasts?

We talked to Renee Pinsky, M.D., an assistant professor of radiology at the University of Michigan whose specialty is breast imaging. Dr. Pinsky was involved in helping to shape Michigan’s dense breast notification law.

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Pause and take a deep breath

For many the initial reaction of hearing “It’s cancer” is shock followed by “I need to get this out.” Michael Sabel, M.D., chief of surgical oncology at the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center, shares why it’s OK to take a deep breath, and consider all your options before starting treatment.

 

 

Take the next step:

  • Read one patient’s decision on pausing before deciding on her course of treatment
  • Find out why it’s OK to seek a second opinion

 

The University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center’s 1,000 doctors, nurses, care givers and researchers are united by one thought: to deliver the highest quality, compassionate care while working to conquer cancer through innovation and collaboration. The center is among the top-ranked national cancer programs, and #1 in Michigan according to U.S. News & World Report. Our multidisciplinary clinics offer one-stop access to teams of specialists for personalized treatment plans, part of the ideal patient care experience. Patients also benefit through access to promising new cancer therapies.

The sixth vital sign: Patient distress

Detecting distress is the first step to helping patients recover.distress June15

When going to see a health care provider for an office visit, we expect to be asked about our physical health and have a physical exam that measures our vital signs. Emotional health, sometimes called the sixth vital sign, is harder to figure out. In fact, emotional or psychosocial problems can persist for years without a provider being aware that their patient is in distress.

This has changed for cancer patients, many of whom do experience high levels of distress. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network describes distress as “an unpleasant emotional experience of a psychosocial, social, and/or spiritual nature that may interfere with the ability to cope effectively with cancer, its physical symptoms, and its treatment.” So what is being done to address this? Continue reading

Testicular cancer: Early detection is key

As I was writing something recently on clinical updates, I came across one type of cancer that is not CAL_testicularcancer2015brought up very often, testicular cancer. I remembered the story a friend of mine shared about her husband, age 30-ish that had been complaining of pain in his testicular region ever since his young daughter jumped on him…OUCH!!

He went for a checkup and sure enough, he had testicular cancer. He underwent surgery, and did not need chemotherapy or other treatment as his cancer was contained in one testicle. This was many, many years ago, and he continues to enjoy his life and functions just fine without any complaints from his wife. We are in our 50s now, thank goodness that he went to get checked out. Continue reading