Hey Sugar – are you Public Enemy No. 1?

Our dietitians explain good sugar versus bad sugar

sugar in processed foodsIs sugar really public enemy number 1? The simple answer is no. But sometime sugar can be bad for us. There are actually “good” sugars and “bad” sugars.

Good sugars are natural sugars (also called complex carbohydrates). They are found in fruits and whole grains. These types of foods not only have sugar, they also have anti-disease nutrients that should be included in a healthy diet.

“Bad” sugar — the sugar we need to be careful of — is the sugar that gets added in cooking and pre-made/packaged foods. And it’s not just in cakes, cookies and soft drinks. Added sugars are also found in tomato sauce, ketchup, salad dressings, cereals, crackers and breads. Continue reading

What are small cell and non-small cell lung cancers?

Non-small cell lung cancer makes up most of the diagnoses

lung cancerWhile lung cancer is less common than cancers of the breast or prostate, it is responsible for nearly a third of all cancer deaths in the United States – 27% according to the American Cancer Society. The stigma of lung cancer being a “smoker’s disease” still persists despite the fact that 20% of deaths from lung cancer occur in those who never smoked. The last few years have been very exciting for lung cancer research. New immune and targeted therapies are available to treat this very deadly cancer.

Surprisingly, lung cancer is not one disease. It is classified into three types based upon the type and location of cell involved: small cell, non-small cell and lung carcinoid tumor. Continue reading

Women’s Health Resource Center empowers women throughout their lifespan

women's health resource centerJanuary is cervical cancer awareness month, but instead of writing about a specific disease, I’d like to provide information to women (and men) about the Women’s Health Resource Center. This center is found in the University of Michigan Von Voigtlander Women’s Hospital and provides women access to educational resources, wellness information and outreach activities.

Its classes are offered throughout Southeast Michigan. This center is staffed by volunteers who assist clients in accessing helpful health and wellness information. They also offer: Continue reading

Family genetic counseling can identify children at risk for cancer

As many as 10% of pediatric cancer patients have a cancer-related gene mutation

family genetic counseling

Identifying children at risk for hereditary cancer helps families engage in cancer prevention.

As advances in next generation sequencing technology becomes increasingly important in treating adult cancers, the same advances are equally important in managing treatment for pediatric cancer patients. For example, recent work by researchers at the University of Michigan on the Peds-MiOncoSeq study found that identifying mutations present in tumor tissue can lead to changes in treatment recommendations. Continue reading

Cancer-fighting nutrition and plant compounds

Phytochemicals and antioxidants are plant-based substances our bodies need

cancer-fighting nutrition

Foods, not dietary supplements, are the best sources for cancer-fighting phytochemicals and antioxidants.

Are you curious about where to find cancer-fighting phytochemicals and antioxidants like flavonoids and Vitamin E? Do you ever wonder if you should be taking supplements? Want to know how to add more color and variety to your meals to prevent cancer or reduce your risk of cancer coming back? Look no further to learn more about cancer-fighting nutrition! Continue reading

A meaty debate: Can red meat be part of a healthful diet?

Small amounts of red meat are fine, when part of a plant-based diet

Eat red meat sparingly, avoid processed meat.

The World Health Organization classifies processed meats as carcinogens and says red meat is probably a carcinogen. Our cancer nutritionists recommend eating only small amounts of red meat, and avoiding processed meats.

 

With all the focus on a plant-based diet for overall health and reduction of cancer risk, and recent media hype reporting red and processed meat cause cancer, meat lovers are left to wonder if their favorite foods are still allowed.

The WHO (World Health Organization’s) International Agency for Research on Cancer just released its analysis of the literature to date and concluded red meat and processed meat are likely carcinogenic, or cancer-causing foods. They cited a 17% – 18% increased risk of colorectal cancer with as little as two ounces of processed meat or four of ounces red meat per day. Continue reading