New books on cancer, survivorship and relationships to check out

There’s always something new for patients and families in our library, the PERC

Our library, the PERC, is a warm, inviting retreat at the Cancer Center

Our library, the PERC, is a warm, inviting retreat at the Cancer Center

At the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center’s full service library, the Patient Family Education Resource Center – or PERC – librarians and volunteers are always ready to help. Books, electronic devices (some can be checked out), suggested reading lists and other resources are available to Cancer Center patients, families and caregivers. Not sure what you want? Staff at the PERC can help you figure it out.

Here are just some of the recently purchased books you can find at the PERC: Continue reading

Our digital gift to you: guided imagery for peace and relaxation

Turn off the phone, get comfortable, point and click

guided imagery

Click on our guided imagery pages for 12 free audio downloads of soothing words, sounds and images for relaxation, healing and pain relief.

 

Guided imagery is a gentle but powerful technique that focuses and directs the imagination. It can be just as simple as an athlete’s 10-second reverie, just before leaping off the diving board, imagining how a perfect dive feels when slicing through the water. Or it can be as complex as imagining the busy, focused buzz of thousands of loyal immune cells, scooting out of the thymus gland on a search-and-destroy mission to wipe out unsuspecting cancer cells.

This simple technique to suggest positive mental images, feelings and thoughts can also be a way for you to find freedom from tension and stress. It can provide calm amidst worries, and relief from physical discomfort. Continue reading

Taking some of the stress out of new patient appointments

Our intake coordinators gather your medical records so you don’t have to

Medical records and test results are just some of the things the intake coordinators can get from your doctor’s office ahead of your first Cancer Center appointment. Pictured are just some of the intake coordinators at the Cancer Center who are here to help. From top left:

Medical records and test results are just some of the things the intake coordinators can get from your doctor’s office ahead of your first Cancer Center appointment. Pictured are some of the intake coordinators at the Cancer Center who are here to help. From top left: Amanda Perez, Barbara Ayotte, Christine Fergus, Christine Manners, Christine Nolen, Dianne Hatfield. Row 2: Ileana Chandler, Mary Jane Blaisdell, Nancy Dixson, Rob Bridges, Theresa Jordon.

A cancer diagnosis itself is overwhelming. Usually the next step is to make an appointment with a cancer doctor. But the practical side to making appointments, even second opinion appointments, may seem difficult. The U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center staff understands this and tries to make the appointment process as easy as possible on patients, or on family members helping to arrange the appointment. Intake coordinators smooth the way by assembling all the past medical documentation a new patient has that relates to a cancer diagnosis.

There are 30 different clinics at the Cancer Center which focus on specific cancer types. Each clinic has an intake coordinator who is responsible for obtaining medical information for new patients. This helps to relieve some of the stress new patients and their families may experience leading up to that first appointment with a Cancer Center doctor. Continue reading

Family genetic counseling can identify children at risk for cancer

As many as 10% of pediatric cancer patients have a cancer-related gene mutation

family genetic counseling

Identifying children at risk for hereditary cancer helps families engage in cancer prevention.

As advances in next generation sequencing technology becomes increasingly important in treating adult cancers, the same advances are equally important in managing treatment for pediatric cancer patients. For example, recent work by researchers at the University of Michigan on the Peds-MiOncoSeq study found that identifying mutations present in tumor tissue can lead to changes in treatment recommendations. Continue reading

Cancer-fighting nutrition and plant compounds

Phytochemicals and antioxidants are plant-based substances our bodies need

cancer-fighting nutrition

Foods, not dietary supplements, are the best sources for cancer-fighting phytochemicals and antioxidants.

Are you curious about where to find cancer-fighting phytochemicals and antioxidants like flavonoids and Vitamin E? Do you ever wonder if you should be taking supplements? Want to know how to add more color and variety to your meals to prevent cancer or reduce your risk of cancer coming back? Look no further to learn more about cancer-fighting nutrition! Continue reading

Sofia Merajver: In pursuit of medicine and science

From Buenos Aires to Ann Arbor, reasoning skills foretell a career in medicine

Sofia Merajver

Growing up in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Sofia Merajver always knew she wanted to be a doctor and scientist.

 

Many children play at being doctors, but Sofia Merajver actually diagnosed her first patient at the age of five.

On a visit to her beloved Uncle Julio’s home, she found relatives gathered outside his room discussing his medical condition with doctors. Julio was struggling to breathe and close to death. Merajver was an early reader fascinated with the human body.

Having just finished reading an illustrated high school textbook about the respiratory system, she asked her uncle, “Does it hurt when you breathe in or when you breathe out? Does it hurt more at the beginning or the end?” From his responses, she knew that the problem was in his diaphragm. She interrupted the adults’ conversation to share her diagnosis. Continue reading