CPR and AED: Save a life with basic knowledge

Cardiac events cause the deaths of more than 350,000 people each year

CPR hands on dummy

Basic knowledge of CPR and AED procedures can help save a life.

CPR and access to Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) — portable devices that measure the heart’s activity and produce a mild shock to help restore proper rhythm after a sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) — can saves lives.

Knowing how to perform CPR and use an AED could save the life of a loved one.

According to the American Heart Association (AHA), approximately 92 percent of sudden cardiac arrest victims die before reaching the hospital, but statistics prove that if more people knew CPR, more lives could be saved. Immediate CPR can double, or even triple, a victim’s chance of survival.

Niles Mayrand, director of operations at the U-M Clinical Simulation Center, Dr. James Cooke, medical director of the U-M Clinical Simulation Center, and Debra Yake, U-M’s AHA Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) & Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) course coordinator and an AHA Basic Life Support (BLS) instructor with Livingston County EMS, are all pushing for those increased survival rates in both in-hospital and the out-of-hospital communities. All have a passion for raising CPR awareness and want everyone to know how to perform high quality CPR and use an AED.
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Top 5 Takeaways on Heart Failure

Dr. Todd Koelling's Mini Med School presentation focuses on heart failure

mini_med_school_cardiovascular_graphic heart blogLeading U-M Frankel CVC researchers and physicians are advancing knowledge, finding new treatments and applying new technologies. Each week one of them shared his or her expertise in a six-week Mini Med School community education program focused on cardiovascular topics.

Here are the Top 5 Takeaways from Dr. Todd Koelling’s Mini Med School presentation on Heart Failure:

1. A serious health concern

More than 5 million people in the United States suffer from heart failure. It is the most common cause of hospitalizations for those over the age of 65 in the U.S. and represents a huge cost burden for Americans. Heart failure is caused by the inability of the heart to pump blood efficiently to oxygenate various organs throughout the body.

The two major categories of heart failure are low ejection fraction and preserved ejection fraction. An ejection fraction is an important measurement of how well your heart is pumping and is used to help classify heart failure and guide treatment. Continue reading

Fresh herbs bring fantastic flavor and heart benefits

Add parsley for texture, flavor and nutrition

herbs blogAs part of our ongoing series about how fresh herbs bring fantastic flavor and heart benefits, today we take a look at parsley. Yes, there are other uses for parsley besides that little garnish sprig on the side of your plate!

Last summer, my parsley plants blessed me with an endless supply of delicious, flavorful leaves. I tried new recipes, tried different ways to save it for later and gave it away to friends and neighbors. In return, my friends and neighbors shared their plans for making chicken soup, tomato sauce and roasted chicken.

The flat leaf varieties of parsley have a peppery taste that is a little stronger than the curly variety. While tabbouleh often comes to mind when I think of parsley, this herb is used in soups, egg dishes, salads and marinades or sauces. Parsley combined with other herbs enhances the flavors of the entire dish. Continue reading

Love your heart, the VA tells women vets

New research reveals the causes of chest pain in women veterans is different from their male counterparts

women vet blogYou’ve probably heard this before: Women have a number of gender-specific heart disease risk factors and warning signs. As a result, doctors coach woman patients to recognize their unique indicators that something might be wrong. Now, research suggests that although women veterans who need a diagnostic cardiac catheterization might be suffering from chest pain like their male counterparts, what’s causing the chest pain is often completely different.

The research was led by Claire Duvernoy, M.D., chief of cardiology at VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System and cardiologist at the U-M Cardiovascular Center. The team found that chest pain was a common reason for both women and men veterans to undergo a diagnostic cardiac catheterization. However, doctors were less likely to find blockages in women’s arteries that could lead to a heart attack or stroke. Continue reading

Seeing double at the Frankel CVC

Twins enjoy "comical confusion"

Mike (left) and Paul Ranella blog

Mike and Paul Ranella

Patients and employees at the U-M Frankel Cardiovascular Center often think they’re seeing double … but it’s likely they’re seeing just fine.

That’s because the CVC is “home” to three sets of identical twins:

  • Mike Ranella is the CVC program manager and his brother Paul Ranella is a CVC device nurse.
  • Corey Foster and Ben Foster are both 4th year medical students who recently completed their rotations at the CVC.
  • Courtney Clark and Rachel Scheich are both nurse practitioners in the CVC ICU.

The six agree that things get confusing at times — mainly in a humorous kind of way. Mike Ranella describes it as “fun confusion” when someone passes him and moments later sees his brother on another floor.  Perplexed looks and comments like, “Didn’t I just see you?” are common, he says.

Then there’s the confusion when one of Paul’s patients wants to talk to Mike about a medical issue. “They often feel compelled to share health information, even when they realize I’m not Paul.” Some patients have even given Mike a hug, he admits. “My brother is well liked, which is a good thing. I’d much rather get a hug from one of his patients than a hit,” he jokes. Continue reading

Top 5 Takeaways on Stroke

Dr. Eric Adelman's Mini Med School presentation focuses on stroke prevention and treatment

mini_med_school_cardiovascular_graphic stroke BlogLeading U-M Frankel CVC researchers and physicians are advancing knowledge, finding new treatments and applying new technologies. Each week one of them shared his or her expertise in a six-week Mini Med School community education program focused on cardiovascular topics.

Here are the Top 5 Takeaways from Dr. Eric Adelman’s Mini Med School presentation on Stroke Prevention and Treatment:

1. Know the signs of stroke

Brain damage can begin within minutes of experiencing a stroke, so it’s important to know the signs of stroke and to seek immediate treatment by calling 911. Rapid treatment can significantly improve your outcome.

Common stroke symptoms experienced by both men and women include:

  • Sudden numbness or weakness of face, arm or leg, particularly on one side of the body.
  • Sudden trouble speaking or understanding.
  • Sudden trouble walking or difficulty with balance or coordination or dizziness.
  • Sudden difficulty seeing or double vision.
  • Sudden severe headache without a clear cause.

FAST (Face drooping, Arm weakness, Speech difficulty, Time to call 911) is an easy way to remember the sudden signs of a stroke. When you spot the signs, call 911 for help.

2. Maintain a healthy blood pressure

Half of all strokes are attributed to high blood pressure. If individuals with high blood pressure can drop the top number of their blood pressure reading by 10 points, they can reduce their risk of stroke by 25 to 30 percent. Most people need medication to lower their blood pressure, but lifestyle factors can also play a role. Don’t smoke, get regular exercise, eat a healthy diet (e.g., Mediterranean diet) and try to avoid added salt.

3. Afib is a risk factor

Individuals with atrial fibrillation (Afib) have an increased risk of stroke, so it’s important to take your medication (warfarin or other anti-coagulant) on a regular basis to help reduce your risk of stroke.

4. Prevention is key

It’s much easier to prevent a stroke than to treat one, so be proactive if you have certain risk factors. For example, if you have diabetes, take the necessary steps to control it. Make sure your cholesterol is well-managed. And keep your blood pressure under control.

5. New device to treat stroke

A new type of device known as a stent retriever has shown tremendous promise in treating stroke patients. Stents, similar to the ones used to open clogged heart arteries, are being used to clear a blood clot in the brain, reducing the amount of disability after a stroke. The stent is temporarily inserted via catheter through the groin to flatten the clot and trap it, and is then removed with the clot. The stent retriever procedure is used for patients with severe strokes.

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Adelman_eric150x150Dr. Eric Adelman is assistant professor of neurology at the University of Michigan and co-director of the U-M Comprehensive Stroke Center. He received his medical degree from Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

 

 

 

Frankel-informal-vertical-sigThe University of Michigan Samuel and Jean Frankel Cardiovascular Center is a top-ranked heart and heart surgery program among Michigan hospitals. To learn more, visit our website at umcvc.org. The U-M Stroke Program is accredited as a Comprehensive Stroke Center by the Joint Commission and participates in the American Stroke Association “Get With The Guidelines®” Quality Initiative.