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Two-time aortic aneurysm survivor shares her experience

One woman's story of hope

Lori Eslick is a two-time aortic aneurysm survivor. Her heart issues began as a newborn when she was diagnosed with a heart murmur and bicuspid aortic valve disease (a congenital abnormality).

Years later, at age 49, a routine EKG led to the diagnosis of an ascending aortic aneurysm.

An ascending aortic aneurysm (also known as a thoracic aortic aneurysm) occurs in the part of the aorta in the chest, situated above the diaphragm, a muscle that helps you breathe. Approximately 25 percent of aortic aneurysms are thoracic, with the rest occurring in the abdomen. Thoracic aortic aneurysms can rupture and lead to severe internal bleeding, resulting in death. They don’t always cause symptoms, even when they’re large. Only half of all people who have thoracic aortic aneurysms notice any symptoms.

Eslick family blogIn Lori’s case, there were no symptoms. At the advice of her doctor, who was also a U-M heart patient, Lori was seen by U-M’s Dr. Himanshu Patel in November 2009 and underwent aortic surgery later that month. After her surgery, Dr. Patel and his team kept a close eye on Lori’s condition, examining her on a regular basis. Four years later, another aneurysm was discovered just below where her previous aneurysm had been repaired, requiring a second surgery. Again, the mother of two and successful artist had no outward symptoms and is grateful for the close watch the CVC team kept on her.

Today, Lori is pursuing her passion for painting and is feeling blessed to be alive.

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Frankel-informal-vertical-sigThe University of Michigan Samuel and Jean Frankel Cardiovascular Center is a top-ranked heart and heart surgery program among Michigan hospitals. To learn more, visit our website at umcvc.org.