Is Miralax safe for kids?

Is Miralax safe for children?A recent New York Times article about the safety of Miralax and similar generic products used to treat children with constipation has struck an alarming chord with many parents.

Miralax and its generic equivalents are one of our first-line-of-defense tools for managing chronic, severe constipation. The ingredient called into question is polyethylene glycol 3350, or PEG 3350. There has been a tremendous amount of investigation into the safety of PEG 3350. In fact, it’s probably one of the most thoroughly studied molecules in our field. The available research provides a strong justification for PEG 3350 as a treatment for childhood constipation, considering both the safety and efficacy of this molecule relative to other medicines sometimes prescribed for severe constipation.

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Newborn screening: racing against time

Grant will fund research in speeding up screening results for tiniest patients

newborn screeningNewborn screening is a complicated system in a race against time. And if we lose the race, children can die from these disorders. If we can find affordable ways to make the system of newborn screening run the race faster, we can help save lives. With the help of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and experts across the University in health services, engineering and health policy, my research team is working to find a way to help us run a faster race.

What is newborn screening? Well, shortly after birth, every baby in the US is tested for a variety of inherited diseases. If babies who have these diseases are not found and started on treatment, they can become seriously ill, and, in some cases, die. This process of testing and treating children at birth for inherited diseases is called newborn screening. It is a 50 year-old public health program that is conducted in every state across the US. Continue reading

Count on us

A new year's greeting from C.S. Mott Children's Hospital

Elizabeth is 15 years old.  She spends 1 week out of every month at C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital receiving IVIG treatments for autoimmune encephalitis.  But Elizabeth makes the most out of her time at Mott. Alongside our music therapy team, Elizabeth has learned to play the ukelele and piano.

Elizabeth is one of the many reasons we come to work every day.
Everyone from our doctors and nurses to our scientists and social workers are committed to extraordinary care.

From all of us at C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital,
may you have a healthy and joyful 2015.
You can count on us to care for your family, today, tomorrow and always.

C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital
www.mottchildren.org

Not missing prom: How rehab helped high school athlete find new normal after accident

At 16, Julia Covill suffered a traumatic brain injury and other serious injuries that led her on a journey to re-learning to walk, talk and run again

Julia Covill (2nd from left) and friends posing for prom pictures in 2012

Julia Covill (2nd from left) and friends posing for prom pictures in 2012

The Pediatric NeuroRehabilitation program at Milestones is celebrating 25 years of service. Mary Covill shares her daughter’s story

For our daughter Julia, prom night 2012 wasn’t just a rite of passage – it was a milestone we weren’t sure would ever be possible. Except for the walker at her side, you wouldn’t know that the smiling teenager in the purple, strapless dress, arms wrapped around friends while posing for pictures, couldn’t walk or remember everyday words just months earlier.

Some seemingly ordinary moments are forever seared into a parent’s memory. For us, that’s the afternoon of Feb.11, 2012 as Julia left for a friend’s house to get ready for a winter dance. I remember warning her it was supposed to snow. I remember telling her to drive slowly.

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The heart of a fighter: Dan’s story

After three heart surgeries, hospice, a stroke and heart transplant, rehab has helped bring Dan back on track to attend college

A long way from being placed in hospice at age 2. Dan, 19, graduates from high school this year.

A long way from being placed in hospice at age 2. Dan, 19, is planning to attend college soon.

The Pediatric NeuroRehabilitation program at Milestones is celebrating 25 years of service. Mary Foy shares how her son Daniel has faced numerous challenges in his life, but thanks to his time at Milestones, he’s preparing to attend college next year.

Many parents talk about the whirlwind of emotion surrounding the day of their first baby’s birth and our story was no exception. Within hours of experiencing the joy and excitement of finally meeting our firstborn, blue-eyed baby boy Dan, I learned he had a serious heart condition that could kill him.

Dan had what’s called hypoplastic left heart syndrome, a rare congenital heart defect that occurs when parts of the left side of the heart don’t completely develop. At four days old, instead of coming home, he was undergoing his first open-heart surgery at University of Michigan’s C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital.

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5 reasons we shouldn’t joke about kids with food allergies

5 reasons not to joke about food allergiesManaging food allergy in schools remains a challenge. There is little evidence to guide school officials in managing and balancing both the needs of the 8% of children with food allergy, as well as the children without food allergy. Recent data from the March 2014 C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health demonstrated that there is no clear parental consensus on how to manage such issues. Striking a balance that allows all parties to feel their needs are validated is a tremendously difficult task, but mutually acceptable solutions are accomplishable.

In this light, recent comments made by elected a Clawson, Michigan school board member at their November Board of Education Meeting are disheartening and inappropriate. The board member suggested that students with food allergies “should be shot” as a means of accommodating their health concerns. Obviously, she was joking, but the comments were insensitive. Food allergy is not a laughing matter, and these children should not serve as a target of derision. Here are a few reasons why food allergies must be taken seriously within the education community.

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