Baby’s here, and so are the “Baby Blues”

what moms should know about the baby bluesHaving a baby is one of the most joyous occasions of one’s life, but that doesn’t mean it doesn’t also come with emotional ups and downs. More than half of all new moms will experience postpartum “blues” about three to four days after delivery. Baby blues are caused by sleep deprivation and hormone fluctuations and typically pass in about one to two weeks.

To help cope with the baby blues, don’t be afraid to reach out for help. Eating well helps, as does getting sleep. Try to sleep when the baby does. Limit well-meaning visitors who may be more of a burden than help for the first several weeks. If you had a c-section, realize that your baby blues may be exacerbated by the stress hormones released while your surgical site heals.

For the first few weeks after baby is born, focus on the fundamentals — eating well and sleeping (for both you and the baby). Spend time bonding with your baby and don’t worry if the house gets dirty or you haven’t showered for a day or two. By the time the baby is six weeks old, life will settle down a bit, and it will settle down even more so by the time he or she is four months old. That’s a relatively short time period to just focus on the fundamentals of caring for yourself and your baby.

Some women have more than the baby blues, they have post-partum depression. Continue reading

Looking for better tests to identify kids with Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes

Finding better diabetes testsAs a pediatric endocrinologist, I see many overweight or obese children who are referred for evaluation of prediabetes or type 2 diabetes.

You may be asking, what is type 2 diabetes? It’s the type of diabetes that is associated with carrying excess weight. Only adults used to develop type 2 diabetes, but now unfortunately more and more kids are getting the disease as well.

And what is prediabetes? It’s a condition where individuals don’t have high enough blood glucose levels to be classified as having diabetes, but have a much higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the future compared with other kids.

Pediatricians often refer overweight and obese kids to specialists like me for evaluation of these conditions, but they all don’t necessarily need to see us. The problem is that it’s currently hard to distinguish a child with a high BMI who is at risk for developing diabetes from one who is not; if we knew which tests could best identify kids with prediabetes and diabetes, we could save some patients the step of seeing a pediatric endocrinologist, and get the ones who DO need to see a specialist in for an appointment sooner. The challenge is all about getting the right kids to a specialist at the right time, thereby making our healthcare delivery system more efficient and providing better care to those who need it.

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My name is Jason, and DNA sequencing is helping my family Block Out Cancer

Jason and Amelie StrzalkowskiWhen our youngest daughter, Amelie, was 22 months in the fall of 2012, we noticed that she started to have balance problems. She went from zooming around the house to being less steady, and then one Sunday, she stood up and simply fell over. That set off warning bells for me and my wife, Shelley.

We scheduled an appointment with our pediatrician for that Wednesday. From there, our pediatrician sent us to the ER at C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital. Thursday morning she had an MRI where they discovered a brain tumor. Amelie was diagnosed with medulloblastoma, a kind of fast-growing tumor. On Friday, she had a 13-hour surgery to have as much of the tumor removed as possible. The team at Mott took tissue samples from the tumor to study them further.

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My Name is Katie and I’m fighting Ewing’s Sarcoma in my battle to Block Out Cancer

Katie Shaver - Block Out CancerI just started my senior year at Marlette High School, but my teen years have been a pretty different experience than most other girls my age. When I was in eighth grade, I had pain in my hip for a few months. I went to a chiropractor who thought it was arthritis. When the pain did not go away, I had X-rays that showed a grapefruit-sized mass attached to my hip. I was diagnosed with Ewing’s Sarcoma, a cancerous tumor that is most often found in bones or nearby tissue.

I was referred to C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital for care. Because the tumor was in my hip, my first experiences at Mott were with the oncology clinic and Dr. Biermann, an orthopedic surgeon who specializes in orthopedic oncology. With Dr. Biermann, I underwent surgery to remove the tumor and my ilium (the large bone in your pelvis) on November 30th. I also had 13 rounds of chemo stretching from August through April. The chemo was not fun! I lost my hair and felt sick. I missed volleyball season that year.

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My name is Jordan and I’m helping Block Out Cancer with strikeouts

mott blog - jordan taylor boc When I played on the U-M softball team, I got involved in a program for student-athletes called Michigan From the Heart. In that program, U-M student-athletes met at C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital every Thursday evening to visit patients and their families. It’s a big deal for the U-M sports teams, and we often rushed from practice on Thursdays so we could go.

We’d divide up so each group of student-athletes included a good mixture of athletes from different sports, and then we’d spread out around the hospital. It was an amazing experience and really opened my eyes to the struggles and the courage of these children and their families. My father died of cancer at the start of my junior year of college, after being in remission for 5 years, so cancer has also made a mark on my personal life.

After graduation, I was drafted to the USSSA Pride National Pro Fastpitch softball team. I wanted to continue to help Mott and raise funds, so I combined my love of softball with my passion for Mott and created FIGHT. We held our first “So You Think You Can Hit” event in 2012. I’m a fastpitch softball pitcher and over the years, I’ve heard many of my male friends brag how they could hit one of my pitches. I had them step up to the plate, make a donation and give it a shot.

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My Name is Teresa and I’m helping Block Out Cancer by raising awareness

Terese Alexander RNWhen I was 44 years old, I had a couple of strokes. It was then that my doctors discovered that I had a congenital heart defect, a hole in my heart. Because it’s a condition most commonly found and treated in children, I had surgery at Mott by a pediatric cardiologist. While I’d been a nurse for nearly 20 years at that point, I decided that I wanted to work where I could make the most difference. I’ve been working in pediatric oncology ever since.

In my job, I help families and patients navigate the journey they take when a child is diagnosed with cancer. Our clinic has Nurse Navigators – each of us are responsible for a certain patient population. I work especially closely with patients in the Solid Tumor Oncology Program. Each of our patients is seen in clinic for evaluation, blood counts, etc, before each round of chemotherapy and also for any worrisome symptoms between treatments.

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