Gaming for Good

Xbox 360 systems now available in patient rooms at C.S. Mott Children's Hospital

mott blog - teen pt xbo

When Anna Dai and Efrain Segarra signed up to take an entry-level computer engineering course at University of Michigan, they expected to learn about game software development.

What they did not expect was to find themselves taking gaming to a whole new level through a massive project at U-M C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital. Thanks to their efforts – along with the generosity of dozens of other individuals and groups – patients at Mott will now find their room equipped with an Xbox 360.

Out of the classroom, into the real world

Efrain Segarra was a freshman when he took Professor David Chesney’s course.

“Dr. Chesney calls it Gaming for the Greater Good,” says Segarra, referring to the course’s focus on developing software that can benefit children with disabilities.

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12 months of Little Victors

2016 C.S. Mott Children's HOspital calendar submissions now open

mott blog - 2016 calendar submission graphic**UPDATE: Submissions are now closed.  If you would like to be added to an email list to be notified when we begin accepting submissions for 2017, please email mottchildren@umich.edu.  Thank you!**

Before we know it, 2016 will be here!  That means it’s time to nominate your “Little Victor” to be featured in our 2016 calendars!

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How my kids taught me about self-acceptance

Born with cleft lip and palate herself, Gail Brazeau worried her kids would face the same challenges she did

When my daughter Adrian had to miss a week of third grade for a surgery related to her cleft lip and palate, she wanted to put together a slide show for her classmates so they knew her story.

“When I was growing in my mom’s belly, my lip did not grow together like yours did.  Neither did the roof of my mouth,” it begins.

Her baby picture was included too, which shows the stitches and bandages around her mouth and nose after her first surgery as a baby when doctors fixed her lip so it was easier to eat.

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What parents need to know about cyberbullying

cyber bullying1Cyberbullying has become a major concern for parents, particularly for parents of children in middle school and high school.

Just like “old fashioned” school yard bullying, though, it can be difficult for parents to know just what to do to help prevent and manage cyberbullying.

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Who can you trust in the vaccine debate?

Politicians and celebrities vs. facts in the vaccine debate

vaccine trustVaccines are in the news again.

It’s not new, this “news.” It’s actually the same story – hashed and rehashed, depending on which celebrity or politician or spokesperson is given the megaphone.

Who is in the news talking about vaccines may change from day to day, but one thing has not.

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Picture This: Empowering craniofacial anomalies patients

Picture This! Craniofacial Anomalies ProgramChildren with craniofacial anomalies spend a great deal of time in their doctor’s office being evaluated and treated. Every visit involves having photographs taken. Not fun pictures. Not even school headshots. But pictures focused on their facial differences.

It’s what is sometimes called the “clinical gaze.” We are carefully examining their facial differences, focusing on them and working to help fix them. In a way, it can be depersonalizing even though my colleagues and I at the Craniofacial Anomalies Program work hard to connect with the children in ways other than their facial differences.

My colleagues and I wanted to do something to give the kids back the magic and fun that kids should feel with the idea of having their photos taken. I’d heard about a project where kids with craniofacial anomalies were paired with artists to have portraits painted, and was struck by how powerful it was for the children to have these immense portraits painted of them. We wanted to give our patients a taste of that experience, but also to give them the gift finding beauty – whatever that is to them – through their own lens.

From that idea, we created “Picture This!

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