Check out U-M Cancer Center events

Dec. 31

Mercy’s New Year’s Eve 2011
Seating from 5:30-10:30 p.m.
Mercy’s, Bell Tower Hotel, 300 S. Thayer, Ann Arbor

Mercy’s, a French and Asian fusion restaurant in the Bell Tower Hotel, will donate a portion of proceeds from prix fixe meals to support breast cancer research at the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center. Two menus will be offered: four courses for $65 per person or eight courses for $95 per person. To make a reservation or find out more, call 734-395-8839.

Jan. 13

Bandito’s Supports the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center
10 a.m.-10 p.m.
Bandito’s Restaurant, 216 S. Fourth Ave., Ann Arbor

Mention the words “Cancer Center” when you place your order at Bandito’s, and the restaurant will donate 30 percent of your bill the the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center’s Patient and Family Support Services Program. This offer is available for dine-in, carry-out or delivery orders. To learn more, call the restaurant at 734-996-0234.

Jan. 21

Free Cervical Cancer Screening
1 p.m.-4 p.m.
U-M Livonia Health Center, 20321 Farmington Road

Cervical cancer will kill more than 4,000 American women this year, but proper screening can save lives. More than half of all cervical cancer cases affect women ages 30 to 55. Hispanic and African-American women are at highest risk. This free screening is open to any woman older than 21 who has not had a Pap test in the past two years and who does not have medical insurance that covers a Pap test. Call the U-M Cancer AnswerLine at 1-800-865-1125 to schedule an appointment.

Jan. 28

Tim O’Brien Trivia Night
O’Kelly Knights of Columbus, Dearborn

Compete for prizes at Tim O’Brien Trivia Night. Proceeds from the event–which will feature appetizers and pizza along with drawings–will support the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center. Cost is $20. For more information or to register, email nmo1268@comcast.net.

Do you have a cancer-related event you’d like to promote? Let us know!


Fighting adrenal cancer with everything we’ve got

Listen to Gary Hammer, M.D., Ph.D., Millie Schembechler Professor of Adrenal Cancer and director of the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center’s Endocrine Oncology Program, discuss his commitment to caring for patients while searching for better treatment options. Hammer recently was involved in an effort to draft a Congressional resolution commemorating the 40th anniversary of the signing of the National Cancer Act.

Learn more about Hammer and the U-M Endocrine Oncology Program.

The Color of Cancer: U-M Cancer Center works to eliminate racial, ethnic health disparities

Regina Kelley and Vanessa Smith take turns leading the Saturday morning exercise class in the Ann Arbor Bethel A.M.E. Church multipurpose room. They wear matching red T-shirts, bedazzled by rhinestones spelling “GAP,” shorthand for “God Answers Prayers.” They call out the steps choreographed to a mix of rhythm and blues and gospel music. While other exercise teachers might remind their classes to breathe, Kelley and Smith don’t need to. The class quietly sings along to the music, punctuating grapevines with claps and snaps.

Ann Arbor Bethel A.M.E. Church hosts a weekly exercise class for its members to encourage healthy living.

Ann Arbor Bethel A.M.E. Church hosts a weekly exercise class for its members to encourage healthy living.

The class is an extension of Body & Soul, a program designed by the National Institutes of Health to encourage African-American churches to help the members of their congregations adopt healthier lifestyles to prevent cancer and other diseases. Ann Arbor Bethel A.M.E. is one of 14 churches that partner with the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center through Body & Soul.

“It’s part of our duty as Christians to stay healthy,” said Bonita Cowan-Tucker, a coordinator of the Health and Wellness Ministry at Ann Arbor Bethel A.M.E. “We tell our members, ‘You can’t help anyone else if you need help because you’re sick.’”

The Body & Soul program is one of many activities under way at the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center that seek to address health disparities. Cancer statistics show that African-Americans, Asian-Americans, Latinos and Native Americans are at higher risk for certain cancers and suffer disproportionately high death rates. The reasons for these disparities are complex. But through a combination of community outreach and research, the Cancer Center seeks to better understand these trends and reverse them. Here’s a look at some of the work under way.

Continue reading

‘Tis the season for turkey, gravy, pie and acid reflux

Jack Selby had suffered from heartburn all of his life, especially around the holidays when he overindulged in some of his favorite food and drink. He thought over-the-counter antacids had solved his problem. It turns out they were only masking a condition known as Barrett’s esophagus, a disorder that frequently leads to a form of esophageal cancer called adenocarcinoma.

The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma has increased by 350 percent over the last decade, making it the most rapidly increasing malignancy among white males.

“A little bit of heartburn between Christmas and New Year’s isn’t going to kill us from cancer, but prolonged heartburn because we overeat, we eat late at night, we sit in front of the television and have a snack before we lay down at night with a full stomach, or are overweight, is an issue to be aware of,” says Mark Orringer, M.D., professor of surgery in the Section of Thoracic Surgery at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center and a leader in the treatment of esophageal adenocarcinoma.

Learn more.

Check out U-M Cancer Center events

Dec. 24-26

Holiday Hours at the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center

Cancer Center Infusion will be closed on Friday, Dec. 24, and will reopen on Monday, Dec. 26, from 7 a.m.-7:30 p.m. Cancer Center Clinics and Urgent Care will be closed on Monday, Dec. 26.

Dec. 31

Mercy’s New Year’s Eve 2011
Seating from 5:30-10:30 p.m.
Mercy’s, Bell Tower Hotel, 300 S. Thayer, Ann Arbor

Mercy’s, a French and Asian fusion restaurant in the Bell Tower Hotel, will donate a portion of proceeds from prix fixe meals to support breast cancer research at the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center. Two menus will be offered: four courses for $65 per person or eight courses for $95 per person. To make a reservation or find out more, call 734-395-8839.

Do you have a cancer-related event you’d like to promote? Let us know!


Not Only a Doctor

Michael Soileau, M.D.

Michael Soileau, M.D., from Beaumont, Texas, is in his third year of a neurology residency at the U-M. As an undergraduate at Baylor University, he registered to be a bone marrow donor. One day last year he got a call that changed his life — and that of a complete stranger.

“I was driving home, exhausted, after a 30-hour shift. I got a call I didn’t recognize; it was the National Bone Marrow Registry. They’d found a match — was I still interested? I said yes, absolutely.

“Rotating through the cancer service at U-M, I took care of patients who needed transplants so this was really special to me. Now I was not only a doctor, but helping someone as a donor.

“It’s easier than people think: five shots in five days, then six hours hooked up to a machine to filter out the bone marrow stem cells in your blood. Out one arm, in the other. That was it.

“A year later, we talked on the phone. He’s a 54-year-old guy from New Hampshire. He had leukemia, but my bone marrow ‘took’ beautifully and now he’s in remission. The first thing he said was, ‘Thank you. You saved my life.’ ”

—Courtesy of Medicine at Michigan