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Is my child ready for overnight camp?

is your child ready for overnight campWith summer just around the corner, making plans for your child’s summer vacation may be on your mind. The options are vast, and depending on the age and maturity of your child, overnight camp may be up for consideration for this summer.

How young is too young? Continue reading

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‘A day on the lake changed my life’

U-M student continues recovery, encourages water safety

“I pretty much remember everything,” says 20-year-old Taylor Janssen about the July 2015 day that changed his life. The University of Michigan Ross School of Business student dove into the lake by his house after a volleyball, but a shallow spot in the water made for a much more complicated day.

Taylor’s friends pulled him out of the water, called his dad and they were on their way to the hospital, where U-M neurosurgeons worked to stabilize his cervical injury.

“I just went out for a day on the lake, and it changed my life,” Taylor says.

Taylor’s dad, Mark Janssen, now looks at the risks people take in a different way than he used to.

“It just takes one mistake to alter your life forever,” Mark says.

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Walk for heart health!

Get ready now for National Walking Day on April 6

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Walking is great for many reasons, especially if you find yourself sitting at a desk all day. That applies to quite a few of us because, according to the American Heart Association, sedentary jobs have increased 83 percent since 1950. So it’s important to get moving during lunch, after work and on weekends for heart health and overall well-being. 

You can get started by gearing up for National Walking Day on Wednesday, April 6. Then, make a commitment to incorporate walking into your daily routine. Continue reading

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13 ways to decrease swallowing problems in Parkinson’s disease

Many people with Parkinson's disease experience problems with swallowing food, liquid and medications

Many people with Parkinson’s disease experience problems with swallowing food, liquid and medications

People with Parkinson’s disease may notice changes with swallowing, especially as the disease progresses. Speech-language pathologists evaluate swallowing (in addition to speech and communication skills) and provide treatment and suggestions to facilitate swallowing.

Here is some information you may find helpful.

Basic swallowing suggestions

  1. Sit upright. Bring the liquid or solid up to mouth; don’t bend your head down to the table.
  2. Start meals by taking small sip of water to moisten mouth.
  3. Take smaller bites and small sips.
  4. Swallow everything in your mouth prior to the next bite or sip.
  5. Avoid tipping head back when swallowing.
  6. Alternate swallows of liquids and solids.
  7. Eat and drink more slowly.
  8. Swallow again or swallow twice if needed.
  9. Do not try to talk and swallow at the same time.
  10. Time your medication to get maximum benefit during meals.
  11. Keep auditory and visual distractions (such as the radio, TV, conversations, etc.) to a minimum during meals.
  12. Sit upright for at least 30 minutes after eating to help prevent heartburn/reflux.
  13. Maintain good oral hygiene. Brush teeth after every meal.

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92-year-old U-M TAVR patient honored

Madge Cowles makes the trip of a lifetime, thanks to her TAVR

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Photograph by Leisa Thompson.

At the tender age of 92, Weltha “Madge” Cowles still looks forward to new experiences. In fact, she recently returned from what she says was the experience of a lifetime: being honored in Washington, D.C., for her Rosie the Riveter work during World War II. Rosie the Riveter was the name given to American women who worked in factories and shipyards during WW II.

Madge became a “Rosie” at the Willow Run bomber plant in Ypsilanti at age 18. Eventually, she was trained to perform electrical work on bomber planes, alongside her father. For three years, the pair drove from their home in Albion to Willow Run, working during the week and sleeping in a trailer, then returning home on weekends. “I enjoyed my work and fellow workers. I never missed a single day,” she says proudly. Continue reading

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Register now for the April 9 Breast Cancer Summit

Breast Cancer Summit

This year’s Breast Cancer Summit will take a look at how treatment decisions are made; in the afternoon, the focus shifts to continuing to thrive and move forward.

 

Have you wondered how decisions are made in breast cancer treatment? The upcoming U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center’s Breast Cancer Summit offers a glimpse into the multidisciplinary approach our breast cancer patient receives from medical and surgical oncologists, radiation oncologists, pathologists, geneticists, reconstructive surgeons, nurses specializing in cancer care, and more.

Breast cancer survivors, caregivers and members of the general public concerned about breast cancer and risk reduction are welcome to attend. Continue reading