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U-M Healing Heart Retreat features Dr. Victor Strecher

Heart patients discover how to take part in their own healing process

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Six years ago, Victor Strecher, Ph.D., said goodbye to his daughter, Julia, who died of a rare heart condition at the age of 19. Today, this U-M professor and director for Innovation and Social Entrepreneurship of at the University of Michigan School of Public Health has learned to channel his grief, helping others along the way.

Dr. Strecher’s commitment to teaching his 250 students as if they were his own daughter has fueled his belief in living a purposeful life. “Identifying your core values and aligning them with your life’s purpose — whatever you determine that to be — can help you change your behavior in positive and profound ways,” he says. Continue reading

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National Cancer Moonshot

Reflections on the new presidential initiative by a cancer nurse

National Cancer MoonshotAt the State of the Union Address in January, President Obama shot out a rocket concerning cancer research and finding a cure by 2020. This “moonshot” initiative is being led by Vice President Biden, who recently lost a son to glioblastoma, a type of brain cancer.

The National Institutes of Health will receive additional funding to bring its budget up to $2 billion. The National Cancer Institute will receive an additional $264 million towards its 2016 budget.  WOW!

The thinking behind this generous funding is that it will allow scientists the opportunity to pursue potential avenues that might lead to a cure for cancer. These avenues might not otherwise have been pursued due to lack of funds. Continue reading

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Daylight saving time impacts timing of heart attacks

Heart attacks rise the Monday after setting clocks ahead one hour

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Heart attacks occur most often on Monday mornings, but research shows a 25 percent jump in the number of heart attacks occurring the Monday after we spring forward for daylight saving time, compared to other Mondays during the year.

It seems the hour of lost sleep during daylight saving time may play a bigger, perhaps more dangerous role in our body’s natural rhythm than we think, according to a study led by the University of Michigan Frankel Cardiovascular Center. Continue reading

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Registered dietitians share 10 tips for good health

Learn the experts' personal strategies for healthy living

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In recognition of National Registered Dietitian Nutritionist Day (March 9), we asked University of Michigan Health System registered dietitians how they incorporate professional training and knowledge into their personal lives. Here, they share 10 tips for good health: Continue reading

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Another genetic cause found for colorectal polyps and cancer

Polymerase Proofreading Associated Polyposis can be identified through genetic testing

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Anyone with the inherited gene mutation PPAP has an increased risk for colorectal polyps and/or cancer.

People with a personal or family history of multiple colorectal polyps may be familiar with well-known hereditary syndromes causing colorectal polyposis and cancer. These include Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) and MYH Associated Polyposis (MAP). Recently, another syndrome was added to the genetics alphabet soup – Polymerase Proofreading Associated Polyposis, or PPAP for short. Continue reading

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Top 6 causes of neuropathy

Neuropathy is a common neurological problem

Neuropathy is a common neurological problem

If you have neuropathy—a disease of one or more peripheral nerves that causes numbness, pain and even weakness—you’ll be happy to know that there is help within reach and possibly factors within your control.

There are six main causes of neuropathy, which is now the second main neurological condition, after headache:
1. Diabetes is the most common cause of neuropathy
Diabetes causes about half of all neuropathies. Even pre-diabetes is of concern to physicians because it leads so often to diabetes.

Treatment of the diabetes can slow down the progression of neuropathy—and also help people with all the other things that diabetes can affect, like eyesight, kidney problems, strokes and heart attacks.

If you have diabetes or pre-diabetes, diet and exercise will benefit you greatly.  Continue reading