Hope for advanced heart failure patients

Studies aim to improve quality of life

hope blog

Tremendous advancements have been made since the first U.S. human heart transplant was performed in 1968. Today, promising new studies involving devices and procedures are giving hope to the 5.1 million advanced heart failure patients living in the U.S.

Several studies currently being conducted by physicians, researchers and scientists at the University of Michigan Frankel Cardiovascular Center are building on the success of our Heart Failure Program. These include:

  • MOMENTUM III: This study compares the HeartMate III heart pump with an older version (HeartMate II) to evaluate whether a smaller pump design with new features will benefit patients with advanced stages of heart failure. The heart pump is intended as a bridge to heart transplantation or as destination therapy.
  • CTSN Cell Therapy LVAD Trial II: This study will evaluate the use of stems cells that are injected into the patient’s heart at the time of receiving a Left Ventricle Assist Device (LVAD). This study will determine if stem cells improve the function of the heart.

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Total artificial heart keeps advanced heart failure patient going and going

Design advances lead to smaller, more portable ventricular assist devices

Without a human heart, Stanley Larkin has visited a water park this summer and plays basketball with family and friends.

Stan Larkin is back in the game, using a backpack-sized power supply for his total artificial heart.

Stan Larkin is back in the game, using a backpack-sized power supply for his total artificial heart.

He has a total artificial heart which is used when end-stage heart failure affects both sides of the heart and other more common heart-supporting devices are inadequate to keep patients alive.

“The device Stan has is the SynCardia temporary Total Artificial Heart, a mechanical pump to bridge him to transplantation,” says University of Michigan cardiac surgeon Jonathan Haft, M.D.  “He’s still listed for a heart transplant and we hope to transplant him as soon as an organ is available. In the meantime he can be at home, he can be functional, and continue to rehabilitate himself so he’s in the best possible shape when his opportunity comes.”

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