Fetal DNA Testing

Fetal DNA TestingIn late 2011, a new method of fetal genetic testing was introduced. Called cell-free fetal DNA testing or non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT), this testing uses maternal blood to test for abnormalities in the fetal DNA. First introduced to detect Down syndrome (trisomy 21), the test is now also used to detect the less common trisomies 18 and 13 as well as other conditions.  This type of test is offered by several different companies that each have their own brand name for the test.

We offer NIPT to all women at increased risks for the designated conditions.  Those in the high-risk group include women over the age of 35, someone with a blood test result or ultrasound marker associated with a chromosome abnormality, and anyone with a family history or previous pregnancy with a history of one of these conditions.

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5 things that may surprise you about Certified Nurse-Midwives

vvwh blog - midwife photoI’ve been a midwife for 10 years, and I love my job everyday – even when it’s exhausting and difficult. It’s an amazing experience to work together with women and their families through the transformative experience of welcoming a new family member and stepping into motherhood.

Midwives have been providing health care to women for centuries, but a lot has changed since the early days of midwifery. Today, certified nurse midwives are an important part of the healthcare delivery system, with rigorous certification standards. In fact, in 2012, midwives delivered 11.8% of all vaginal births in the U.S., and that number is on the rise!

Still, many misperceptions about midwifery exist. In honor of National Midwifery Week, which runs from Oct. 5 to 11, here are five things you may not know about certified nurse-midwives.  Continue reading

Immunizing mom (and baby): Vaccines while pregnant

Maternal immunicationsPregnant women want to do everything they can to help their baby be healthy. One of the best things you can do is get your recommended vaccines while pregnant. Vaccinations help protect pregnant women from illnesses like the flu and they help support the immune system of their unborn children.

Protect Mom

Pregnancy changes your immune system. It makes you more likely to get some illnesses and more likely to have severe symptoms. Having the flu during pregnancy can cause problems for your pregnancy, including affecting the growth of the baby, causing fetal distress, leading to an early delivery, and increasing the chance of a cesarean section. Anyone who is pregnant during flu season should get a flu shot as soon as they are available. Because we do not recommend live vaccines in pregnant women, we only use the flu shot, not the nasal flu mist.

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Your birth plan

Creating a plan, getting your questions answered, and being prepared for the unexpected

birth plan blog post - birthing ball picA “birth plan” is like a game plan for your baby’s arrival.  You have little control over when your labor starts, but a birth plan ensures that you, your partner, and your care team are all aware of your wishes on some key things like pain meds, the people involved, episiotomies and cord cutting.

When to start your plan:

Usually I discuss the birth plan with my patients at the beginning of the third trimester.  Often it is the childbirth classes she takes that help a woman make decisions about the type of birth she wants. If a woman has not taken classes, I suggest other resources available online or at the library that will help her make choices regarding her baby’s birth.

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Expecting a baby during flu season?

Newspapers, web pages, and the evening news have constant reminders of the people who are a priority for receiving flu vaccines (particularly H1N1). Are you on the list? If you are pregnant, you probably already know that you are in the high priority group for receiving the vaccination for the H1N1 flu. Continue reading