Women and sexuality after bladder cancer

women and sexuality after bladder cancerRecovering sexuality after bladder cancer can be difficult for women. In December, Daniela Wittmann, Ph.D., LMSW, CST, and LaShon Day, PA-C, both from the University of Michigan Department of Urology, were the experts featured in a series of four webinars on this topic, sponsored by the Bladder Cancer Awareness Network.

The one-hour webinars are now available for viewing on YouTube for anyone wishing to gain a better understanding of sexuality and intimacy after treatment for bladder cancer: Continue reading

Blue light cystoscopy for bladder cancer

New technique uses a blue light to see more of the bladder cancer tumor

blue light cystoscopy

Blue light cystoscopy offers a significant advance in bladder tumor detection and, in Michigan, is only offered at the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center. It uses a special dye, along with a blue light inside the patient to make cancer tumors more visible to surgeons. Left: tumors as seen with a traditional white light; right: the same tumors more visible with a dye and blue light.

 

mCancerPartner sat down recently with Cheryl Lee, M.D., a surgeon and professor of urology, to discuss blue light cystoscopy, a technology that significantly improves the detection of non-muscle invasive (early stage) cancer of the bladder during surgery. Dr. Lee’s research focuses on improving quality of life and surgical outcomes for bladder cancer patients. She is active with the Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network, where she has served as president of its Scientific Advisory Board and is currently a member of the Board of Directors. She is Past-Chairman of the Bladder Cancer Think Tank.

mCancerPartner: Can you talk about bladder cancer tumors and the challenges they present in regard to removing all the cancer. Continue reading

Living with a urinary diversion or neobladder

urinary diversionA patient with bladder cancer called and told me that she was scheduled to have her bladder removed (cystectomy). Her daughter was getting married in another state and she wanted to know about traveling after the surgery. I was happy to tell her that people with a urinary diversion are usually able to return to the life, work, and hobbies they previously enjoyed, including travel.

When the bladder is removed, it is necessary to create a new method for the patient’s body to handle urine. Urinary reconstruction and diversion is a surgical method to create a new way for you to pass urine. There are three ways to do this, called urinary diversions: Continue reading

Happy 25th anniversary, Cancer Center! One long-term patient describes how his cancer was cured.

25Clark

Clark Charnetski looks back on his cancer, part of our Happy 25th anniversary series at the Cancer Center.

Name: Clark Charnetski

Birthdate: Jan. 17, 1942

Diagnosis: Bladder Cancer

U-M Doctor: James Montie, M.D.

Age at diagnosis: 54

In the spring of 1996, Clark Charnetski had a backache. Initially suspecting a urinary problem, an X-ray with dyes found a tumor. Within a few hours, he had an appointment with James Montie, M.D., who diagnosed bladder cancer. That summer, Charnetski underwent chemotherapy and radiation to shrink the tumor before surgery.

“Chemo at the time was very difficult,” he says. “I was really sick, especially Continue reading