Register now for the April 9 Breast Cancer Summit

Breast Cancer Summit

This year’s Breast Cancer Summit will take a look at how treatment decisions are made; in the afternoon, the focus shifts to continuing to thrive and move forward.

 

Have you wondered how decisions are made in breast cancer treatment? The upcoming U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center’s Breast Cancer Summit offers a glimpse into the multidisciplinary approach our breast cancer patient receives from medical and surgical oncologists, radiation oncologists, pathologists, geneticists, reconstructive surgeons, nurses specializing in cancer care, and more.

Breast cancer survivors, caregivers and members of the general public concerned about breast cancer and risk reduction are welcome to attend. Continue reading

Breast Cancer Summit 2015

Not just for breast cancer patients and survivors

On Saturday, April 18th the University of Michigan’s Comprehensive Cancer Center Breast Oncology and Community Outreach Programs (with support from the Michigan affiliate of Susan G. Komen, U-M School of Public Health, and QVC presents FFANY Shoes on Sales) will give you the opportunity to learn more breast health, the latest advances in breast cancer and learn about the resources available in the community. The Breast Cancer Summit is held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

I have attended the event in the past and was amazed by the uplifting spirit of everyone there. Breast cancer patients and breast cancer survivors have made up the majority of those who attended. However, there also were healthy, non-cancer patients at the summit who wanted to learn more about general breast health and what type of screening is recommended.

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Treating lymphedema after breast cancer

lymphedema

Lymphedema symptoms can include swelling in the hands or feet.

Katherine Konosky is making a presentation on lymphedema on Saturday, April 12 at the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center’s Breast Cancer Summit. See more details below about this free event.

As many as 10 million Americans suffer from lymphedema, which causes swelling in arms, legs or other parts of the body. It can be a frustrating and chronic long-term side effect of cancer treatment. Although it is more common than multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease and breast cancer – combined – lymphedema has historically been little understood, even by health care professionals. The good news is that with improved imaging equipment, we are understanding more about the function of the lymphatic system. Continue reading