Reap health benefits using the power of the plate

health benefitsYour plate can be a powerful weapon! No, we’re not talking about using it as a projectile object for self-defense. Instead you can wield your plate to prevent disease, help with recovery, manage stress, boost your memory and even slow down aging, plus so much more! Focus on adding foods that provide the benefits specific to your needs and you will likely reap additional health benefits. Continue reading

Nutrition for cancer fatigue

For someone with fatigue as a side effect of cancer treatment, it isn’t just about feeling sleepy and wanting to go to bed a little earlier, says Danielle Karsies, a cancer nutritionist at the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center. It is a bone-weary lack of energy that robs you of the ability to do the things you typically want to do. The following video gives tips on what patients can do to reduce fatigue and improve energy levels.

Take the next step:

  • Learn more from the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center about fatigue as a side effect of cancer.
  • Check out this Thrive story on one patient’s experience with cancer-related fatigue.

U-M CCC dietitians NEWRegistered dietitians who are specially trained in the field of oncology nutrition provide cancer nutrition services at the Comprehensive Cancer Center. They focus on assessing the individual dietary and nutrition needs of each patient and providing practical, scientifically sound assistance.

 

 

Cancer-center-informal-vertical-sig-150x150The University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center’s 1,000 doctors, nurses, care givers and researchers are united by one thought: to deliver the highest quality, compassionate care while working to conquer cancer through innovation and collaboration. The center is among the top-ranked national cancer programs, and #1 in Michigan according to U.S. News & World Report. Our multidisciplinary clinics offer one-stop access to teams of specialists for personalized treatment plans, part of the ideal patient care experience. Patients also benefit through access to promising new cancer therapies.

Plant-based foods and cancer

Nature gives us a treasure trove of health protectors in the foods we eat. In fact, plant-based foods can stimulate the immune system, decrease or slow the growth of cancer cells and prevent the DNA damage than can lead to cancer. In this video, cancer nutritionist Danielle Karsies, M.S., R.D., CSO discusses plant-based foods and their potential for reducing your cancer risk.

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Nutrition therapy for myelodysplastic syndrome and aplastic anemia

aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome While diet has been associated with some cancers as a potential trigger, this is not the case with myelodysplastic syndrome, or MDS, and aplastic anemia. However, a balanced diet is important to maintaining health and well-being and this is especially vital during treatment. By giving your body the fuel it needs, you can help to minimize treatment side-effects and fatigue.

Follow the steps outlined below to maximize your health before, during and after treatment.

Try to eat enough food to maintain your weight during treatment and don’t be surprised if the amount of food you need is increased. If nausea or diarrhea hit you during treatment, eating smaller, more frequent meals that are lower in fiber to ease digestion. Discuss taking a general multivitamin with minerals with your oncologist or dietitian, to ensure you are meeting all your nutrient needs. If you are not having any side effects, eat a variety of minimally processed foods that focus on non-starchy vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and lean proteins. Try to include non-meat alternatives on occasion such as beans and nuts. Limit sugary beverages and focus on water for hydration instead. Continue reading

Using nutrition to prepare for cancer treatment

prepare for cancer treatmentIf you have run a marathon before, you know there is a good deal of training involved and you need the right kind of fuel to help you succeed. Cancer treatment is like running a marathon, so “training” and “fueling” before you start are just as important. There are two training levels to choose from as you prepare for cancer treatment. The level you choose will depend on how you are feeling prior to treatment.

“Training” Level 1

If you have been able to maintain your weight and tolerate a general diet prior to Continue reading

Heart-healthy nutrition for cancer survivors

Chemo drugs can cause heart issues

plate of healthy food

Cancer treatment can affect the heart, so heart-healthy eating is especially important for cancer patients.

Cancer patients may develop heart-related issues as a result of chemotherapy or radiation. Common health concerns include heart failure, arrhythmias, blood clots, high blood pressure and myocardial ischemia (lack of blood flow to the heart muscle), which can lead to a heart attack.

Known as cardiotoxicity, the condition can show up during cancer treatment or even years after treatment for cancer. Studies have shown that up to one-third of cancer patients who receive chemotherapy drugs such as trastuzumab (Herceptin) and anthracyclines will develop cardiotoxicity.

With a goal of minimizing heart damage caused by these treatments, the University of Michigan Samuel and Jean Frankel Cardiovascular Center recently launched Michigan’s first Cardio-Oncology Program. The program is one of only a handful around the world with scientists and physicians working together to address the effects of cancer treatment on the heart.

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