The search is on – finding a clinical trial that’s right for you

clinical trialsMaybe you’re a patient who has exhausted all your treatment options, or you’re looking for a specific type of treatment not yet approved or offered as standard of care. You seek a second opinion at a major cancer center only to learn they aren’t offering a study, or you don’t qualify for the intended study or treatment.

What do you do? There are several steps and resources that can help you find the trial that best meets your needs. Continue reading

When breast cancer treatment leads to breast cancer pain

breast cancer painmCancerPartner sat down recently with Norah Lynn Henry, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of internal medicine and a breast cancer specialist, to discuss breast cancer pain from treatment and how researchers are working on this pervasive problem.

mCancerPartner: Many breast cancer survivors are relieved to have moved past their surgery, chemotherapy and hormone treatments but now have the burden of pain from the treatment. What causes this pain?

Dr. Henry: Truthfully, as doctors and researchers we are not yet entirely certain, but we’re trying to find out. We know that peripheral nerve damage is common with chemotherapy and can cause numbness, tingling and pain. Chemotherapy may also affect the nerves in the brain and spinal column as well. Then there is the pain related to aromatase inhibitors (AIs), an anti-hormone treatment given to postmenopausal women.

mCancerPartner: What advice would you give to breast cancer survivors who are having pain as the result of their breast cancer treatments? Continue reading

Advancing research for brain cancer treatment

brain cancer

Malignant brain tumor

In recognition of brain cancer awareness month, the focus of my blog is on the latest developments in treating this particular cancer. Glioblastoma or glioblastoma multiforme is the most common brain cancer in adults. According to the American Brain Tumor Association, glioblastomas represents about 17% of all primary brain tumors. They can be difficult to treat because the tumors contain so many different types of cells. They tend to be both aggressive and fast growing. The National Cancer Institute says the mortality rate for brain cancer has remained largely unchanged over the past 30 to 40 years. Therefore looking at new ways to treat brain cancer is desperately needed.

One of the hottest areas of clinical research into brain cancer involves the use of immunotherapy, or stimulating the immune system to attack cancer. The National Cancer Institute defines Continue reading

Clinical trial tests targeting prostate cancer treatment

Are certain drugs more effective against some types of prostate cancers than others? Researchers know that not all therapies work for all patients – the next question is to figure out how to match the right treatments with the right patients.

A new clinical trial is testing whether an experimental drug can maximize the effect of current treatment and whether matching that drug to a genetic anomaly can lead to better, more personalized treatment for prostate cancer. The trial, led by investigators at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, is being conducted at 11 sites throughout the country. Continue reading

Your invitation to Ann Arbor’s Breast Cancer Summit

A community event

If you are a breast cancer survivor, caregiver or member of the general public concerned about breast cancer, please join us for a Breast Cancer Summit on Saturday, April 20, 2013 at Washtenaw Community College. The summit bridges the gap between our community and academic medicine by giving the audience a chance to ask questions and interact with U-M breast cancer specialists. Many are leaders nationally in the fight against breast cancer.

Maria Lyzen, right, and Ruth Freedman lead the Cancer Center's Breast Cancer Advisory and Advocacy Committee.

Maria Lyzen, right, and Ruth Freedman lead the Cancer Center’s Breast Cancer Advisory and Advocacy Committee.

The summit was organized through encouragement from the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center’s breast cancer advocates. They feel the summit is a way to let the community know that the U-M breast cancer specialists are collaborative and multidisciplinary. Panel discussions and a mock tumor board will give the audience a first-hand look at how these leading oncologists work together on behalf of their patients. They will also give an update on the latest breast cancer research at Michigan and nationally, showing what has been learned and how vital research donations are to these research advances.

The summit will cover:

  • cancer prevention
  • screening
  • treatment
  • research, including clinical trials
  • survivorship
  • genetic risk Continue reading

Screening for Colorectal Cancer: Time to Stop Avoiding the Colonoscopy

“Your doctor said you need WHAT?” People can feel a bit uneasy when a doctor mentions screening for colon cancer or rectal cancer.

Danielle Turgeon, M.D., is one of the University of Michigan gastroenterologists who perform colonoscopies.

Danielle Turgeon, M.D., is one of the University of Michigan gastroenterologists who perform colonoscopies.

But, according to the American Cancer Society, colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in both men and women in the United States. Preventing colorectal cancer, and not just finding it early, is why doctors recommend colorectal screening tests, even though the subject may seem embarrassing to discuss.

Colorectal cancer starts in the colon or rectum, most often as a polyp, or small piece of tissue that projects from the inner wall. Screening tools can find cancer in people before symptoms show up, which is when colorectal cancer is most easily treatable. Some also can find and remove suspicious-looking polyps before they become cancerous, which may prevent colorectal cancer.

Who should be screened:

  • Starting at age 50, men and women of average risk for colorectal cancer
  • People with a personal or family history of colorectal cancer or pre-cancerous polyps
  • People with inflammatory bowel disease
  • People with certain other risk factors, including a known family history of a hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome

The American Cancer Society recommends the following screening tests: Continue reading