Another genetic cause found for colorectal polyps and cancer

Polymerase Proofreading Associated Polyposis can be identified through genetic testing

colorectal polyps and cancer

Anyone with the inherited gene mutation PPAP has an increased risk for colorectal polyps and/or cancer.

People with a personal or family history of multiple colorectal polyps may be familiar with well-known hereditary syndromes causing colorectal polyposis and cancer. These include Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) and MYH Associated Polyposis (MAP). Recently, another syndrome was added to the genetics alphabet soup – Polymerase Proofreading Associated Polyposis, or PPAP for short. Continue reading

Trained to screen patients for colon cancer, nurse finds a genetic link to this disease in her own family

Lynch syndrome

The Sylvest family tree includes Lynch syndrome, a genetic disorder that can cause cancer.

Lisa Sylvest is a cancer survivor who never met her father Karl’s parents. They lived in Denmark with their other son and daughter. Growing up, Lisa simply knew that her grandmother died at age 54 of a ‘female’ cancer. When Lisa was in high school, Karl’s brother died of brain cancer, also at age 54. Time passed, Lisa entered nursing school and her father’s sister developed endometrial cancer. Lisa traveled to Denmark to meet her relatives face-to-face for the first time.

When her father was diagnosed with advanced colon cancer at age 68, Lisa was a U-M Health System nurse working in gastroenterology, which deals with stomach and intestinal disorders. Her Continue reading

A new diagnosis of colon cancer – what is next?

cancer diagnosis.fwThere are several paths that can lead patients to a diagnosis of colon cancer. You may have had symptoms that worried you, such as finding blood on your toilet paper. Or perhaps the doctor removed suspicious polyps during a routine colonoscopy. Either way, hearing that you have a diagnosis of colon cancer can be a shock, making it hard to process what the next steps might be or what decisions must be made. These tips can help you prepare for your first appointments with cancer specialists and understand what is going to happen over the next months: Continue reading

Are your genetics putting you at risk for colorectal cancer?

cancer geneticsColorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States, trailing only lung cancer in the number of deaths each year. The American Cancer Society estimates 50,310 people will die from colorectal cancer in 2014 alone. Unlike lung cancer, however, there are ways to successfully screen for and prevent this common disease.

In conjunction with Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, I have outlined some factors health care providers consider in assessing an individual’s risk for colorectal cancer and determining the best approaches for screening and prevention.

Screening = Prevention

Colon cancer screening has been very effective in reducing the number of colorectal cancer diagnoses and deaths in the United Continue reading

Bottoms up: “My doctor said I need what?!”

Screening for colorectal cancer: It’s time to stop avoiding the colonoscopy

colonscreen.fwWe’re all prone to the uncomfortable feeling that arises when a doctor mentions screening for colon or rectal cancers. Despite the unease surrounding this topic, it’s time to stop avoiding the colonoscopy and get screened! There are often no symptoms with colorectal cancer. You can’t feel a polyp, and very rarely will you see visible blood. For this reason, screening is the most effective way to be protected.

According to the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, colorectal cancer is the third-leading cause of U.S. cancer deaths in both men and women. Further, it is currently the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States. That is why doctors recommend screenings, even though they may be embarrassing to discuss.

Colorectal cancer starts in the colon or rectum, most often as a polyp, or a small piece of tissue that protrudes from the inner wall. Screenings help prevent colorectal cancer by finding precancerous polyps so they can be removed before they progress. Everyone needs screening because we are all at risk for colon cancer. If everyone got screened we could prevent up to 90% of colorectal cancers. Continue reading

Screening for Colorectal Cancer: Time to Stop Avoiding the Colonoscopy

“Your doctor said you need WHAT?” People can feel a bit uneasy when a doctor mentions screening for colon cancer or rectal cancer.

Danielle Turgeon, M.D., is one of the University of Michigan gastroenterologists who perform colonoscopies.

Danielle Turgeon, M.D., is one of the University of Michigan gastroenterologists who perform colonoscopies.

But, according to the American Cancer Society, colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in both men and women in the United States. Preventing colorectal cancer, and not just finding it early, is why doctors recommend colorectal screening tests, even though the subject may seem embarrassing to discuss.

Colorectal cancer starts in the colon or rectum, most often as a polyp, or small piece of tissue that projects from the inner wall. Screening tools can find cancer in people before symptoms show up, which is when colorectal cancer is most easily treatable. Some also can find and remove suspicious-looking polyps before they become cancerous, which may prevent colorectal cancer.

Who should be screened:

  • Starting at age 50, men and women of average risk for colorectal cancer
  • People with a personal or family history of colorectal cancer or pre-cancerous polyps
  • People with inflammatory bowel disease
  • People with certain other risk factors, including a known family history of a hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome

The American Cancer Society recommends the following screening tests: Continue reading