Like salty foods? Study shows salt may not be all bad

More research needed to know how much salt each person's heart can handle

chef using seasoning blogOnly 1 percent of adults meet the current guidelines for dietary salt intake, which has led to efforts to reduce sodium in common foods like bread and soup. However, a new research study in over 2,600 seniors suggests that salt intake doesn’t strongly affect heart health in older adults.

Authors of the JAMA Internal Medicine study brought to a simmer the debate over which is better – longstanding federal guidelines to consume no more than 2,300 milligrams of sodium a day, or a new low of 1,500 milligrams or less. Based on information from dietary questionnaires, neither sodium guideline showed remarkable results in protecting from heart attack, stroke, or heart failure.

At first, this looks like good news for those who’ve eaten the same way for a long time and can’t imagine changing what’s on their plate – but the findings don’t necessarily mean patients can leave their doctors’ offices ignoring good advice about salt restriction. Continue reading

Fight cancer-related fatigue with food and exercise

Up to 96% of people treated for cancer report fatigue. But how you eat, drink and spend your day can reduce your fatigue and may even boost your energy levels. University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center dietitians offer their tips for fighting fatigue in the latest issue of Thrive, the Cancer Center’s patient publication.

Among their tips:

  • Eat small, frequent meals and include a protein-rich food with each meal or snack.
  • Stock your pantry with extra staples to avoid frequent, energy draining grocery shopping trips.
  • Keep high-calorie, high-protein nutrition supplements on hand for easy nutrition on the run, such as Boost Plus, Ensure Plus, Carnation Instant Breakfast or nutrition bars.
  • Try batch cooking. Ask family or friends to double a favorite recipe or do so yourself on high-energy days. Freeze individual portions for quick, healthy meals.
  • Keep healthy foods on hand that require little preparation, including pre-packaged pudding and yogurt cups, peanut butter, tuna fish, cottage cheese, eggs, string cheese and soup. (Select cream-based soups for added calories and protein.)

Visit Thrive to read the full story and get more tips on living better with cancer. Or, to schedule an appointment with a Cancer Center dietitian, call 1-877-907-0859.