Don’t forget the future: Medical research funding at a crossroads

Detroit Free Press guest column, Nov. 2, 2014

microscope.fwThe contributions of medical research to understanding health and treating disease are a modern miracle.

If our nation hadn’t spent the last decade cutting funding for medical research, might we have an Ebola vaccine by now? Or made breakthroughs in the treatment of cancer, developed new approaches to treating heart disease, or made progress against antibiotic-resistant infections?

The possibilities are endless. Unfortunately, we will never know what might have been possible.

Continue reading

Collaboration and Innovation will defeat Cancer

logos for the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center, the National Cancer Institute and the National Comprehensive Cancer NetworkIf you’ve visited the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center’s website, or happened to read a news article about the Center; you may have noticed we have an association with the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network; (NCCN).  What you may not know is the importance of these associations – particularly as it relates to cancer treatment and research.

The NCI, part of the National Institutes of Health, supports and coordinates cancer research projects conducted by universities, hospitals, research foundations and businesses in the United States as well as world-wide.  In turn, the NCI collects and shares information about cancer treatment and research.  As an NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center – one of only 41 in the country — the U-M Cancer Center has the opportunity to represent the needs of our community in the national dialogue. We also have access to national and world-wide research collaborations – as well as the opportunity for our own research to receive funding.   Our NCI funding has allowed our doctors and researchers to explore promising new ways to make cancer care less toxic, more compassionate and more effective.

The NCCN is a not-for-profit alliance of 21 of the world’s leading cancer centers dedicated to improving the quality and effectiveness of cancer care.   One of the NCCN’s most significant projects is the clinical practice guidelines.  The guidelines offer treatment, prevention, detection and supportive care standards that can be used by patients, doctors and other health care decision-makers.  Our doctors are at the table helping to determine the best practices in cancer care. By standardizing these methods for treating and preventing cancer, the NCCN ensures quality care for cancer patients nationwide.

Becoming a U-M Cancer Center patient means your treatment will follow the latest and best guidelines that have proven effective over rigorous study. But more than that – your U-M health care team belongs to a collection of the best cancer providers in the country, providing the best care to you and your family.