Each widow’s journey through grief is unique

Guest blogger Kristin Meekhof shares her story on coping with grief after the loss of her husband to adrenal cancer.

Guest blogger Kristin Meekhof shares her story on coping with grief after the loss of her husband to adrenal cancer.

In 2007, my late husband was diagnosed at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center with an ultra-rare form of cancer: adrenal. There is a one in a million chance that someone will be diagnosed with this form of cancer and unfortunately, my husband was diagnosed with advanced cancer. Approximately eight weeks after his first visit to his primary care physician (not associated with the University of Michigan) he died. At the time I was 33, and we had no children together. This is my story about grief and widowhood.

C.S. Lewis said, “We read to know that we are not alone,” and I couldn’t agree more. While reading this blog about my story will not resolve your problems, there is comfort in knowing that others have traveled the same path. As part of my research for my upcoming book, my co-author, psychologist James Windell and I interviewed dozens of widows. I also read many books about grief. What I have learned, to my surprise, is that each widow’s journey through grief is unique. Many widows speak about the intense loneliness (regardless if they live with children) and the cold sharp emotional pain. Death does damage. However, the pain will not always be as intense.

During the first year after my husband’s death, I found that the last thing I wanted to do was reach out to others. This was before text messaging and I Continue reading