Men and lymphedema: no duct tape needed for self-care

Men are just as likely as women to develop lymphedema after surgery

men and lymphedema

Katherine Konosky finds her male lymphedema patients focus on short term solutions – she takes extra care to educate them about self care, since an important goal is to reduce the severity of future lymphedema episodes.

 

mCancerPartner recently talked about men and lymphedema with Katherine Konosky, OTR/L, MS, CLT-LANA, an occupational therapy clinical specialist in the U-M Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation. She is the lead occupational therapist for the Cancer Rehabilitation/Lymphedema Program.  Her team does a monthly lymphedema education class at the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center for patients whose cancer surgery involved the arm, chest or back.

mCancerPartner: In your practice, do you treat many men who have lymphedema? Continue reading

Treating lymphedema after breast cancer

lymphedema

Lymphedema symptoms can include swelling in the hands or feet.

Katherine Konosky is making a presentation on lymphedema on Saturday, April 12 at the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center’s Breast Cancer Summit. See more details below about this free event.

As many as 10 million Americans suffer from lymphedema, which causes swelling in arms, legs or other parts of the body. It can be a frustrating and chronic long-term side effect of cancer treatment. Although it is more common than multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease and breast cancer – combined – lymphedema has historically been little understood, even by health care professionals. The good news is that with improved imaging equipment, we are understanding more about the function of the lymphatic system. Continue reading