Two-time aortic aneurysm survivor shares her experience

One woman's story of hope

Lori Eslick is a two-time aortic aneurysm survivor. Her heart issues began as a newborn when she was diagnosed with a heart murmur and bicuspid aortic valve disease (a congenital abnormality).

Years later, at age 49, a routine EKG led to the diagnosis of an ascending aortic aneurysm.

An ascending aortic aneurysm (also known as a thoracic aortic aneurysm) occurs in the part of the aorta in the chest, situated above the diaphragm, a muscle that helps you breathe. Approximately 25 percent of aortic aneurysms are thoracic, with the rest occurring in the abdomen. Thoracic aortic aneurysms can rupture and lead to severe internal bleeding, resulting in death. They don’t always cause symptoms, even when they’re large. Only half of all people who have thoracic aortic aneurysms notice any symptoms. Continue reading

Ascending aortic aneurysm patient is back to living

Two-time survivor shares her story and artwork

Lori Eslick blog

Lori Eslick enjoys plein air (open air) painting.

Lori Eslick had her first aortic root aneurysm repair in 2009 at age 49. As a regular runner and active mom, she had no symptoms related to the ascending aortic aneurysm that was growing. Her heart issues began as a newborn when she was diagnosed with a heart murmur and bicuspid aortic valve disease (a congenital abnormality).

When she became pregnant at age 39, a preventive EKG revealed no additional heart concerns. Then, 10 years later, another routine EKG ordered by Lori’s new general physician detected a problem that ultimately led to the diagnosis of her ascending aortic aneurysm. Her doctor recommended she go to the University of Michigan.

Lori was first seen by Dr. Himanshu Patel in November 2009 and underwent aortic surgery later that month. After her surgery, Dr. Patel and his team kept a close eye on Lori’s condition, examining her on a regular basis. Then, four years later, a second aneurysm was discovered just below where her previous aneurysm had been repaired — again with no outward symptoms. Continue reading