U-M Nurse Inspires 2015 Heart Walk Team

Hearts on the Run team leader walks in honor of her dad

MicheleDerheim

Michele Derheim, RN, hopes to inspire others to participate in the 2015 Heart Walk

Michele Derheim, RN, will be among the hundreds of U-M employees who gather on the campus of Eastern Michigan University on May 9. They’ll be participating in the American Heart Association’s 2015 Washtenaw County Heart Walk/5K Run to help raise funds for the fight against heart disease and stroke.

Inspired by her 78-year-old father who suffers with peripheral arterial disease, Michele is currently recruiting runners for her team, “Hearts on the Run.” A born motivator, she hopes to inspire others to participate in the Heart Walk and to embrace a healthy lifestyle, something she did eight years ago in anticipation of her 40th birthday.

“I realized that I needed to take better care of myself,” Michele says. Even though she was a frequent walker and aerobic exerciser, she found it wasn’t enough. She began a walking/running routine that soon had her running three miles, then 5K races and, finally, a full marathon in 2013. Her father’s condition has made her commitment to fighting heart disease and embracing a healthy lifestyle even stronger. Continue reading

Exercise and heart health

Some experts call it the "magic medicine"

Outdoor exercise image 450x320

Just 30 minutes of exercise a day offers significant health benefits.

Exercise is a critical component of good health. In fact, some experts have called it the “magic medicine” when linking exercise and heart health. Whether it’s a simple walk, a family bike ride or an intense workout, exercise plays a significant role in the reduction of certain diseases. So, if you’re at your ideal weight or 20 pounds overweight, participating in some form of exercise has benefits in areas of heart disease, diabetes and joint health.

Can you spare 30 minutes a day?

A study by Dr. Mike Evans, founder of the Health Design Lab, reveals that 30 minutes of exercise a day is the single best thing you can do for your health. In his educational video, Evans asks the question: “Can you limit your sitting and sleeping to just 23 and a half hours a day?”

Evans’ research shows that a woman who goes from no activity at all to one hour of exercise per week can reduce her risk of heart disease by almost half. Other research has linked sitting for long periods of time — whether watching TV or sitting at a desk — with a number of health concerns, including increased blood pressure, high blood sugar, excess body fat around the waist and abnormal cholesterol levels. Continue reading

Honesty key in doctor-patient relationship

Good communication helps keep you healthy

man-and-doctorWhen it comes to recommendations made by healthcare professionals, many patients don’t follow through. Whether it’s taking medications as directed or making lifestyle changes — quitting smoking, adopting a healthier diet or committing to daily exercise — a patient’s failure to comply with their doctor’s advice can stem from a variety of reasons. These can include  forgetting to take a daily medication, failing to fill a prescription due to cost issues, or misunderstanding dosage directions, among others.

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Exercise: The magic medicine

30 minutes per day is the single best thing you can do for your health

woman and exercise ball

Whatever exercise you choose, 30 minutes a day is the single best thing you can do for your health.

Michele Derheim, director of clinical operations at the University of Michigan Frankel Cardiovascular Center and a registered nurse, is a keen supporter of exercise.

“Whether it’s a simple walk or an intense workout, the reduction in disease risks as a result of exercise is phenomenal,” Derheim says. “Whether you’re at your ideal weight, or 20 pounds overweight, participating in some form of exercise has health benefits in the prevention of heart disease, diabetes and joint problems.”

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Atrial fibrillation – what you need to know

Causes, symptoms and treatments of afib vary

red-heart-stethoscopeAtrial fibrillation (a-tree-uhl fih-bruh-lay-shun), or “afib” (ay-fib), is an irregular heart rhythm (arrhythmia) that starts in the upper parts (atria) of the heart. A common type of arrhythmia in those over the age of 60, “atrial fibrillation is being diagnosed with increasing prevalence,” says Michele Derheim, director of clinical operations at the University of Michigan Frankel Cardiovascular Center and a registered nurse. “The quicker you’re treated for an afib condition, the better your chances are for good cardiovascular health.”

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