Advanced stenting procedure improves U-M patient’s quality of life

Jolette Munoz discovers “a better version” of herself

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Jolette Munoz says her quality of life has improved tremendously over the course of her treatment for various heart issues at the University of Michigan Frankel Cardiovascular Center. But it’s her most recent advanced stenting procedure that has brought the most dramatic improvement in her quality of life, she says.

Jolette’s health issues began with a massive heart attack in 2009, which was followed by triple bypass surgery to treat a 90 percent blockage in her left anterior descending (LAD) artery. Then, later that year, she was treated for peripheral artery disease (PAD), a vascular arterial disease that causes blockages in the arteries to the legs.

Although Jolette’s surgeries improved her quality of life, over the next six years she experienced complications from her bypass. This led to multiple stenting procedures of her bypass arteries, which unexpectedly failed due to weakened blood vessels from radiation treatment for lung cancer several years prior to her heart attack. “It seemed like every other month I landed in the hospital for issues with my stents,” she says. Continue reading

Patient shares her peripheral artery disease experience

Intense leg pain made it difficult to walk even to her mailbox

Jolette Munoz wants people to know something: “I am still here!”

This University of Michigan patient looks at life a little bit differently these days, knowing she has overcome some very difficult health challenges. Jolette credits the care and expertise of doctors at the University of Michigan Samuel and Jean Frankel Cardiovascular Center with helping her beat the odds.

Jolette’s health issues began with a massive heart attack in June of 2009. Then, in August of that year, she underwent triple bypass surgery, followed shortly after by a diagnosis of peripheral artery disease (PAD). In fact, the severe PAD-related pain she first experienced was during cardiac rehab after her bypass surgery. Jolette says the pain began in her calf, and extended up from there. “The pain was so intense that I couldn’t even walk to the mailbox,” she remembers.

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Yoga and peripheral artery disease

New pilot program aims to treat PAD by increasing circulation

woman-yoga-poseThe number of adults with peripheral artery disease (PAD) is expected to increase significantly over the next several decades as the American population ages.

PAD is a disease of the peripheral arteries, most commonly in the pelvis and legs. In cases of PAD, plaque builds up in the arteries that carry blood to your head, organs and limbs. Over time, plaque can harden and narrow the arteries, limiting the flow of oxygen-rich blood to your organs and other parts of your body. Peripheral arterial disease normally affects the arteries in the legs, but it also can affect the arteries that carry blood from your heart to your head, arms, kidneys and stomach.

People with peripheral arterial disease have four to five times more risk of heart attack or stroke and, when left untreated, PAD can lead to gangrene and amputation.

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