Giving birth – an athletic event?

U-M team studies labor, delivery recovery with sports medicine eye; finds never-before-detected fractures, injuries

PregnantAs a researcher and nurse practitioner helping women recover after giving birth, Janis Miller struggled answering some of the most common questions from new moms.

“Many women say they feel like something has changed ‘down there’,” says Miller, who is faculty at the University of Michigan School of Nursing and part of the Healthy Healing After Delivery clinic at the U-M Health System. “What has happened to me? Is this normal?’ Our best answer so far has been ‘well, you did just give birth.’”

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Stretch mark science

Dermatologist expecting a child of his own continues his pregnancy stretch mark research

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Frank Wang, M.D., studied stretch marks caused by pregnancy while his wife was pregnant with their son Grayson.

Studying stretch marks caused by pregnancy hits close to home when you’re expecting a child of your own.

As dermatologist Frank Wang was finishing up his latest research on the topic, he was waiting for his wife to give birth to their first child. Continue reading

Baby blues & beyond: New ways to help new moms with depression

From talk therapy to yoga, U-M team offers care and a chance to help others through research

Postpartum depression affects many women in the first months after a baby is born.

Postpartum depression affects many women in the first months after a baby is born.

They’re supposed to be the happiest times of your life, right? But being pregnant or a new mom can have a dark side – temporary or lasting depression.

How quickly you get help, and what kind of help you get, for symptoms like moodiness, insomnia and loss of appetite can make a big difference for you and your baby.

Maria Muzik, M.D., M.S., who leads a University of Michigan clinic focused on mental health during pregnancy and the first year of a child’s life, offers more information on this important issue. May is the awareness month for these issues.

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Is DVT risk greater in women?

March is DVT Awareness Month

belly of pregnant woman

Pregnancy is one of the risk factors for developing DVT

A woman’s risk for deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE) varies with hormonal exposure, making pregnancy, use of hormone replacement therapy or birth control products important risk factors. According to the Vascular Disease Foundation, DVT and PE are the most common causes of maternal-related deaths.

Preventing blood clots during pregnancy

What can you do to prevent clots during pregnancy? The American Society of Hematology recommends the following:

  • Be aware of risk factors.
  • Know your family history.
  • Make sure your doctor knows about any history of blood clots or blood clotting disorders in your family.
  • Remain active, with your doctor’s approval.
  • Be aware of the signs and symptoms of a blood clot. Visit your doctor immediately if you think you have one.