Grocery shopping for cancer prevention

grocery shopping for cancer preventionApril is National Cancer Control Month and its goal is to boost awareness of cancer, its care and to help more people win the battle against cancer. While it is impossible to completely eliminate the risk of cancer, you can take action to reduce your cancer risk through various lifestyle changes. One key area in your control is making healthy changes to your diet. Instead of just listing these healthy habits, follow the tips below to make your next grocery shopping trip a cancer-fighting experience.

Stick to the list: The very best thing you can do for yourself is to be prepared. Continue reading

A Consequence of Obesity: Increased Cancer Risk

The statistics are alarming and worth sharing: over the past 20 years the number of overweight and obese children and adults continues to climb.  Only 1/3 of people in the United States maintains a healthy body weight — that means 2/3 of the population is considered overweight or obese.

We should be concerned. Excess weight has multiple consequences including enhanced risk for developing cancer, heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure and stroke, among other conditions.

In fact, if you are a man and are obese, you have an increased risk of developing male breast cancer and cancers of the colon/rectum, prostate, pancreas, kidney, esophagus and others.

According to the American Cancer Society, 1 of every 3 cancers is related to excess body weight, poor nutrition or being inactive. If the rising trend in obesity continues, it’s predicted there will be 500,000 additional cases of cancer in the U.S. by 2030.

The National Cancer Institute says research reveals obesity and the development of cancer are linked together in a couple of different ways:

  • fat produces excess hormones (like estrogen and insulin) that encourages the growth of certain types of cancers
  • fat cells can affect cell growth regulation that may result in fostering  tumor growth
  • obesity can result in a chronic inflammation process which impacts the immune system function

Recently, HBO, in partnership with the Institute of Medicine, the National Institutes of Health, the CDC and others released an online documentary titled “The Weight of the Nation”. Watching all or just a few of the videos will be time well spent. It’s a great way to learn more about obesity and get suggestions for ways to take action for yourself, your family or your community.

What action you’ve taken for targeting or staying at a healthy weight? Post your answer below.

Learn more about the risks of obesity and get tips on weight loss

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Sit Less: An Easy Way to Reduce Your Cancer Risk

Let’s face it: We do a lot of sitting. The majority of Americans spend their workday sitting in front of a computer, sitting in meetings, and sitting in the car commuting to and from work.  Then we get home – and we sit to eat, relax, watch television and read.  Or we get on our home computers to catch up with friends, surf the web, play video games, help the kids with homework, or maybe even do a little more work.

We’ve been hearing for years that moderate exercise done every day improves your health and reduces your personal risk for developing cancer, heart disease and diabetes. But recently researchers have learned that making an effort to sit less and stand more several times a day can improve your health and reduce your risk for developing cancer. Continue reading