HPV and throat cancer

HPV and throat cancerRecently I received a phone call from a patient who was concerned about the increased risk of throat cancer related to a human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. When asked, she stated that yes, both she and her partner had engaged in oral sex, therefore, the concerned interest in a potential connection between HPV and throat cancer.

Oropharyngeal cancer in the throat, soft palate, tonsils or base of the tongue can occur as a result of the HPV virus. HPV can cause warts in the genitals, mouth and anus, and is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the United States, particularly in adults younger than 55. This might be related to changes in oral sex practices. Continue reading

Newborn screening: racing against time

Grant will fund research in speeding up screening results for tiniest patients

newborn screeningNewborn screening is a complicated system in a race against time. And if we lose the race, children can die from these disorders. If we can find affordable ways to make the system of newborn screening run the race faster, we can help save lives. With the help of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and experts across the University in health services, engineering and health policy, my research team is working to find a way to help us run a faster race.

What is newborn screening? Well, shortly after birth, every baby in the US is tested for a variety of inherited diseases. If babies who have these diseases are not found and started on treatment, they can become seriously ill, and, in some cases, die. This process of testing and treating children at birth for inherited diseases is called newborn screening. It is a 50 year-old public health program that is conducted in every state across the US. Continue reading

What you need to know about cancer screening

Between 3% and 35% of cancer deaths could be avoided through screening. The risk of developing many types of cancer can be reduced by practicing healthy lifestyle habits, such as eating a healthy diet, getting regular exercise and not smoking. But if cancer develops, it’s best to catch it early: The sooner a cancer is found and treated, the better the chances are that treatment will be successful. Learn more about how you should be screened for cancer at mCancer.org.