Facing breast surgery? Here are facts to consider.

Maria Lyzen, right, and Ruth Freedman lead the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center's Breast Cancer Advisory and Advocacy Committee.

Maybe you’ve heard the recent news reports discussing second surgeries for women with breast cancer.

It’s an important, but complicated topic. So what do you really need to know if you or someone you care about is diagnosed with breast cancer?

Most women diagnosed   with breast cancer will have surgery. Many choose to have breast-sparing surgery or lumpectomy rather than a mastectomy. A lumpectomy removes the cancer, along with a small amount of normal tissue that surrounds it.

New research has found that nearly 23% of women have a second surgery, called a re-excision. Re-excision may need to be done if the pathology report reveals that there are still cancer cells at or near the area where the breast cancer was removed. This is what is referred to as a positive margin. The goal of a re-excision is to reduce the risk of breast cancer returning in the future. Continue reading

Finding the right doctor to treat pancreatic cancer

Finding a doctor can be a daunting task, particularly if you’re facing a pancreatic cancer–a relatively rare, but deadly, diagnosis. Diane Simeone, M.D., director of the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center’s pancreatic cancer research program, recently offered tips to the Lustgarten Foundation about how patients can find the best care for them. The Lustgarten Foundation is a private organization that funds pancreatic cancer research. Each year, 38,000 Americans are diagnosed with pancreatic cancer.

Visit the Cancer Center’s website to read the interview.

 

Organic curiosity: Is it worth the extra cost to buy organic?

A cancer diagnosis often makes people re-evaluate their eating habits, inspiring many to incorporate more organically grown foods in their diets. Some people buy organic because of concerns about the environment, pesticides or animal welfare. Others perceive organic foods to be more nutritious. But considering the higher cost, is there any evidence that organically grown food offers more health benefits than conventionally grown food?

The University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center’s dietitians tackle this question in their latest nutrition column for our patient publication, Thrive. In addition to weighing the pros and cons of eating organic food, the dietitians offer lists of foods that typically contain the high and low levels of pesticides when conventionally grown, so that you can spend your money more wisely.
Visit Thrive to read the full story.