You’ve been diagnosed with an enlarged aorta: Now what?

enlarged aorta blog

If you’ve been diagnosed with an enlarged aorta, you likely have many questions about your condition: How big is too big? When should I be worried? What does “watchful waiting” mean? Are there any early warning signs before it bursts?

Most of the answers to these questions depend on a variety of factors, including your age and body size, medical history and the position and size of your aorta, among others.

University of Michigan Frankel Cardiovascular Center patient Bob Stephens found he had all of these questions and more when diagnosed with a total of five aortic enlargements.

“It’s awfully scary, but you don’t have a choice,” Bob says. “When I was first told about my condition, it worried me, but I knew the U-M team of doctors was watching me closely, especially my abdominal aortic aneurysm, which was large.” Bob admits that “watchful waiting” can be stressful, but “I knew I had the right people taking care of me.” Continue reading

Do you know your risk for an aortic aneurysm?

There are often no symptoms associated with an aortic aneurysm, so it's important to know your health history

Abdominal aortic aneurysmAn aortic aneurysm generally doesn’t cause symptoms until a patient has a significant problem. Most aortic aneurysms are detected by chance — for example, through an imaging test that was ordered to rule out other health concerns.

This is why it’s so important to know your health history. Does someone in your family have an aneurysm? Has a family member died from an aneurysm or experienced a catastrophic event due to an aneurysm? If so, these are indications that you and members of your family should be tested. The key is to know your risk(s) for an aortic aneurysm to reduce your chances of stroke or sudden death. Continue reading