How to thank a nurse

how to thank a nurseFor many patients and their families, the care they receive from C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital and Von Voigtlander Women’s Hospital nurses is transformative. We hear time and time again how families’ experiences – with the individuals who are on the front lines right there alongside them, advocating for each child’s unique situation – have touched their lives.

What you may not know, however, is that these experiences are often equally as transformative for our nurses. Nurses feel the highs of a patient’s triumph and the devastating lows of hearing news you had hoped you would never hear.

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The Power of Flowers

Longest running volunteer group at Mott continues a legacy of healing through flowers

flower therapyIf you’ve ever had a loved one in the hospital, the thought of sending flowers may have crossed your mind.

One group of volunteers at C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital and Von Voigtlander Women’s Hospital understands the power of flowers particularly well, and takes the sentiment to a whole new dimension with their flower therapy program.

Every other week, from September through May, a group of dedicated volunteers known fondly as the Flower Ladies fills the hospital’s Family Center with the delightful sights and smells of fresh flowers.

What the Flower Ladies know, that many families are surprised to learn, is that flowers can be a lot more than decoration for a hospital room shelf.

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Auvi-Q® Recall for Food Allergy Patients

Important information for parents of kids with food allergies

auvi-q recallThis week, Sanofi US issued a voluntary nationwide recall of ALL Auvi-Q® epinephrine injectors.

These injectors, like other epinephrine injectors, are used to treat life-threatening allergic reactions (anaphylaxis).

Families of patients who currently use the Auvi-Q as their auto-injector should contact their physician immediately to arrange for a prescription to one of two alternate epinephrine auto-injectors (EpiPen or Adrenaclick). University of Michigan Food Allergy Clinic patients can contact us directly at 888-229-2409.

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Our whole family was treated for cancer

When our baby was diagnosed with cancer, the medical team took care of all of us.

dominic jamisonOn the Friday our son Dominic turned 9 weeks old, he started throwing up immediately after eating. This continued on and off through out the weekend, so we took him to the pediatrician first-thing Monday. During that appointment, the doctor noticed that his head circumference seemed to be not following the normal growth curve. He sent us to a nearby hospital right away.

There they did an ultrasound and MRI, which revealed that Dominic had a brain tumor. On July 23, 2014, he underwent a seven hour tumor resection. The tumor was quite large, about 40 percent of his brain space. One week later, we learned the tumor was a rare, cancerous tumor, called a Choroid Plexus Carcinoma. We knew the road ahead of us would be a long one. Unfortunately, we just didn’t feel like the hospital we were at was a good fit for us, so we transferred Dominic’s care to C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital.

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Gaming for Good

Xbox 360 systems now available in patient rooms at C.S. Mott Children's Hospital

mott blog - teen pt xbo

When Anna Dai and Efrain Segarra signed up to take an entry-level computer engineering course at University of Michigan, they expected to learn about game software development.

What they did not expect was to find themselves taking gaming to a whole new level through a massive project at U-M C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital. Thanks to their efforts – along with the generosity of dozens of other individuals and groups – patients at Mott will now find their room equipped with an Xbox 360.

Out of the classroom, into the real world

Efrain Segarra was a freshman when he took Professor David Chesney’s course.

“Dr. Chesney calls it Gaming for the Greater Good,” says Segarra, referring to the course’s focus on developing software that can benefit children with disabilities.

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