Reap health benefits using the power of the plate

health benefitsYour plate can be a powerful weapon! No, we’re not talking about using it as a projectile object for self-defense. Instead you can wield your plate to prevent disease, help with recovery, manage stress, boost your memory and even slow down aging, plus so much more! Focus on adding foods that provide the benefits specific to your needs and you will likely reap additional health benefits. Continue reading

Good communication and a take-charge attitude can help close the gap on cancer health disparities

Cancer Center health educator offers tips to African Americans and other minority groups

AfAmerCancerExperienceIn February, Madeline Gonzalez, a health educator at the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center, participated in a panel discussion on the African American cancer experience. It took place at the Cancer Support Community of Greater Ann Arbor in recognition of Black History Month, and addressed the unique ways that cancer impacts the African American community. Here are the highlights of Madeline’s presentation on cancer health disparities, which we are sharing as part of National Minority Cancer Awareness Week: Continue reading

HPV and throat cancer

HPV and throat cancerRecently I received a phone call from a patient who was concerned about the increased risk of throat cancer related to a human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. When asked, she stated that yes, both she and her partner had engaged in oral sex, therefore, the concerned interest in a potential connection between HPV and throat cancer.

Oropharyngeal cancer in the throat, soft palate, tonsils or base of the tongue can occur as a result of the HPV virus. HPV can cause warts in the genitals, mouth and anus, and is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the United States, particularly in adults younger than 55. This might be related to changes in oral sex practices. Continue reading

Register now for the April 9 Breast Cancer Summit

Breast Cancer Summit

This year’s Breast Cancer Summit will take a look at how treatment decisions are made; in the afternoon, the focus shifts to continuing to thrive and move forward.

 

Have you wondered how decisions are made in breast cancer treatment? The upcoming U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center’s Breast Cancer Summit offers a glimpse into the multidisciplinary approach our breast cancer patient receives from medical and surgical oncologists, radiation oncologists, pathologists, geneticists, reconstructive surgeons, nurses specializing in cancer care, and more.

Breast cancer survivors, caregivers and members of the general public concerned about breast cancer and risk reduction are welcome to attend. Continue reading

Healthy eating tips for a spring tune-up

healthy eating tipsLately, there have been a lot of questions and speculations concerning sugar consumption and cancer risk. While researchers are working on finding any such connection between the two, it is important to remember the role sugar plays in the body. Understanding sugar and following our healthy eating tips can serve as a spring tune-up for the body.

Carbohydrates and sugar break down into glucose, also known as blood sugar.

Carbohydrates come from foods such as fruits, starches, beans/peas, and vegetables. During times of low carbohydrate intake or intense exercise, glucose can also be made from fat and protein. Continue reading

Another genetic cause found for colorectal polyps and cancer

Polymerase Proofreading Associated Polyposis can be identified through genetic testing

colorectal polyps and cancer

Anyone with the inherited gene mutation PPAP has an increased risk for colorectal polyps and/or cancer.

People with a personal or family history of multiple colorectal polyps may be familiar with well-known hereditary syndromes causing colorectal polyposis and cancer. These include Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) and MYH Associated Polyposis (MAP). Recently, another syndrome was added to the genetics alphabet soup – Polymerase Proofreading Associated Polyposis, or PPAP for short. Continue reading