Prevention is the best “cure” for cancer: 8 things you can do to prevent cancer

cancer preventionPrevention really is the best cure for any disease. This holds true for the dreaded “C” word as well. The number one best way to prevent cancer is simple: Achieve and maintain a healthy weight. Why? Because up to one third of all cancers have a positive relationship with being overweight and obesity.

Narrowing cancer prevention down to this one goal sounds simple, but actually achieving a healthy weight can be more difficult. It is doable, if you commit to little changes at a time. Just try the following: Continue reading

Gathering your family medical history

family medical historyIt’s not uncommon for younger family members to ask where their grandparents came from, where they lived or how many children they had. Playing detective to figure out the names, locations and relationships of older relatives or distant generations can be fun. Gathering your family medical history can be interesting, too, with the added value of helping the people you love. The results might reveal a family connection to inherited conditions and diseases. Uncovering these kinds of family links can help doctors take better care of your loved ones, including recommending screenings, genetic testing, and looking for early warning signs of disease, including cancer.

Jessica Everett and Victoria Raymond, U-M genetic counselors, say that red flags concerning cancer in your family’s medical history can include:

• More than one relative with the same or related cancers
• Being younger than average when diagnosed
• Having more than one primary cancer
• Having a rare or unusual cancer

More tips:

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Advancing understanding of inherited cancer risk through collaboration: The PROMPT Registry

PROMPTInnovations in genetic testing technology over the past 5-10 years have opened up the ability to test multiple cancer risk genes at one time, at the same or lower cost than past testing for one or two individual genes. As a result, many testing laboratories now offer “next generation panel tests.” These tests allow investigation of multiple cancer risk genes with one sample, at one time, for one cost. This can be an attractive option when the family history could suggest more than one inherited syndrome – one test can evaluate for multiple syndromes. However, panel tests have also created some new challenges for patients and health care providers. Continue reading

Thanksgiving: an ideal time to talk about family health history

family health historyThe U.S. Surgeon General has declared Thanksgiving Day as National Family Health History Day since 2004. Over the holiday or at other times when families gather, the Surgeon General encourages Americans to talk about, and to write down, the health problems that seem to run in their family.

Family members share genes, environment, lifestyles and behaviors that can determine shared risk for diseases such as various cancers, heart disease, diabetes, stroke and obesity. That’s why family gatherings like Thanksgiving are the perfect time to collect your family health history, record it for the future, and encourage family members to share it with their health care providers. These easy steps can help you understand the risk for various diseases and encourage early detection and prevention. Continue reading

Young men and the testicular cancer self-exam

testicular self-examWhile testicular cancer is rare, it is the most common form of cancer in men ages 15-35, according to the Testicular Cancer Society. Generally men in this age group are robust and healthy, so cancer may be something they think only happens to other people. Educating men on the importance, as well as the technique, of testicular self-exam may help to reduce the incidence of this cancer.

Unlike the recommendations for breast self-exams beginning at age 20, and colon cancer screening beginning at age 50, neither the American Cancer Society nor Continue reading

The PALB2 gene

An update on cancer risks and indications for referral for genetic counseling

PALB2 geneThe PALB2 gene, which is also called the partner and localizer of BRCA2, is a gene that contributes to inherited susceptibility to breast cancer and perhaps ovarian and pancreatic cancers. The PALB2 gene contains the directions for making a protein that acts together with the BRCA2 protein. When they are functioning normally, these two genes work together as tumor suppressors.

How does cancer start at the genetic level?

Most cancers occur when two mutations in a tumor suppressor gene occur in a single cell during a person’s lifetime. Some individuals inherit an altered copy of a tumor suppressor gene. If a second mutation occurs in the tumor suppressor gene in any cell of their body, a tumor may develop. Since they already have an altered tumor suppressor gene in all of the cells of their body, individuals with an inherited mutation in a tumor suppressor gene are more likely to develop cancer.

Cancer due to an inherited alteration in a tumor suppressor gene is more likely to occur at a younger age (for example, Continue reading