Fellowship breakfast series serves up health information for men

fellowship breakfastCalling all men! Where can you go to learn about health topics of special importance to men, and do it in a relaxed, casual environment over a healthful breakfast? If you answered the Men’s Fellowship Breakfast, this is your chance to move to the head of the class.

The Fellowship Breakfast series is sponsored by the Cancer Center’s Community Outreach Program, a trusted source for health information about cancer prevention, screening and early diagnosis.

June is Men’s Health Awareness Month, and the next Men’s Fellowship Breakfast takes place on Saturday, June 13, from 8:30 – 11 a.m. Continue reading

Taming the flame: Grill safe this summer

grill safeWe know eating healthy is important in fighting cancer. So how can you enjoy that summer cookout with friends and families without tossing healthy eating aside? Here are some tips on how to grill safe this summer.

Each year, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center dietitians field questions from patients about whether it’s safe to grill, given the evidence that grilled meats may contain cancer-causing agents. Guidelines from the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) suggest that the type of food you grill may be more important than how you prepare it. Continue reading

Squamous cell skin cancer, what is it?

May is national melanoma/skin cancer detection and prevention month

FunInSunThe summer season is fast upon us, and for many, that equates to more time spent outside. The sunshine and warmer weather is a welcome reprieve from the long winter. With this sunny weather comes the reminder to protect our skin from the adverse effects of getting too much sun. Too much sun exposure to the skin can cause cancer to start in the squamous cells of the skin.

Squamous cell skin cancer is the second most common type of skin cancer, and typically the least known. Many patients that are newly diagnosed have never heard of it. Continue reading

Casting call for CDC’s Bring Your Brave

Sharing your breast cancer story will empower and educate young women

Bring Your BraveAccording to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, about 11% of new breast cancer cases in the United States are among women under the age of 45. Many young women at risk may not realize it.

Using what’s known in the theatrical world as a casting call, the CDC is looking for women of any age who meet certain criteria and are willing to share their story publicly. The resulting campaign, Bring Your Brave, will use personal stories to help empower and educate young women about breast cancer’s risks. The casting call will close on May 15, 2015. Continue reading

Improving cancer awareness among minorities

April 5-11 is National Minority Cancer Awareness Week

minority cancerNo minority, race or culture is immune to cancer. Unfortunately, any person can develop cancer. Some groups are more likely to get or die from cancer than others.

We know:

  • African Americans are more likely to die of cancer than people of any other racial or ethnic group.*
  • Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people have risk factors that lead to a greater rate of cancer cases.*
  • Overall, 1 in 2 Hispanic men and 1 in 3 Hispanic women will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime.*

Continue reading