Tips to prevent teen distracted driving

tips to prevent teen distracted drivingAs the parent of a new teen driver you worry about lots of things. You worry about your teen’s skills as a new driver. You worry about your teen being distracted by their cell phone, their friends, or about their desire to eat while driving. How can they stay focused on safe driving and the road ahead?

Rather than simply hoping your teen arrives safely, you can begin the conversation now – teaching them about common distractions and how distractions can lead to a crash.

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Reach Out and Read

mott blog - jess fealy and daughter RoRA trip to the doctor’s office can be scary for small children, but we’ve helped fix that while also encouraging children to read through our involvement in the national “Reach Out and Read” program.

At many of our pediatric primary care clinics, every child from the age of six months to five years who comes in for an annual check up receives a brand new, age-appropriate book for free.

We’ve been participating in this program for 13 years and it’s tremendously valuable to both the doctors and the patients and families.

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Changing Colors

Learn about nutrition with carnations and color!

CIY carnation activity

Photo credit: PaintCutPaste.com

A fun way to teach kids about how our body uses the nutrients we give it is with a simple experiment involving carnations and food coloring.

You’ll need several white carnations (as many as you’d like to experiment with), food coloring, water and a few vases.

The experiment

Fill the vases up about a quarter of the way with water. Add about 10 to 20 drops of food coloring and stir it into the water. Cut off about an inch from the bottom of the stem of the carnation and place it in the vase. Now we wait. You can fill several different vases with different coloring if you’d like.

Every few hours, check back on the carnation to see if anything has changed. You might want to have your child keep a small notebook of observations.

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Improving care for children with inflammatory bowel disease

C.S. Mott Children's Hospital IBD TeamChildren and young adults who have inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) like Crohn’s disease, indeterminate colitis, or ulcerative colitis require careful and diligent medical management to minimize and prevent flare-ups of symptoms, complications, surgeries, and days spent in the hospital.

IBD is a challenging disease to have because right now there is no cure, and symptoms tend to wax and wane over time. For children especially, this can mean they look “normal” on the surface to their peers, but they may be struggling off and on with abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, and fatigue that prevent them from participating in the activities they would like to pursue.  As a result, IBD can be uncomfortable, discouraging, and socially isolating.

IBD is relatively common, affecting about 1 million Americans; the majority of cases are diagnosed in people less than 30 years old. Here at the pediatric GI program at University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital, we take care of approximately 500 children and young adults with inflammatory bowel disease.

Helping end a symptomatic flare of IBD and stay in remission can be a process of trial and error, but it is important to get right so children with IBD can live normal and healthy lives. We believe there is always room for improvement, and there’s so much more we want to know about how we can help manage pediatric IBD more effectively.

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Protecting our Littlest Victors

NICU celebrates 365+ days without a CLABSI

NICU central lineThere was a time when central line blood stream infections (CLABSI) were historically accepted as inevitable and the source of significant medical morbidity and costs.

Today, though, staff, patients and families at Mott are celebrating a remarkable achievement. Thanks to a focused team effort, the Nick and Chris Brandon Newborn Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital has gone more than one year without an infection.

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Parenting & “Sharenting”

The opportunities and risks of parenting in the social media age

Sharenting - The opportunities & risks of parenting in the social media ageParenting – We all know that there is little real world preparation or training for the experience, even as a pediatrician, believe it or not. We therefore have to rely on others to help guide us as we raise our children.

It takes a family. We ask for advice from our moms and dads, our grandmothers and grandfathers, and our siblings with kids.

It takes a village. We get advice from friends who have their own kids, and from colleagues at our schools or in our local community.

It takes a social network? Yes that’s right, social media like Facebook, forums, and blogs are the new venue for parenting, according to a new study by the C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health.

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