Keeping up with medications

Advice for kids, from kids

Living with a chronic illness often means taking medication…sometimes, a lot of medication.

In this week’s new Kids4Kids video, patients from C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital talk about their experiences keeping up with complicated medicine regimens, and some of the tips they’ve used to stay on top of taking meds.

Tell us:

What tips do you have for kids and teens on keeping up with medications and treatment regimens?  Use the “reply” tool at the bottom of this post to share your advice with others!

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Adjusting to the reality of your diagnosis

Coming to terms with the realities of chronic illness or a new medical diagnosis can be difficult.

In this week’s new Kids4Kids video, patients from C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital talk about what worked for them to “keep it real” while adjusting to their diagnosis and treatment.

Tell us:

What tips do you have for kids and teens on how to adjust to a new diagnosis or changes in your treatment plan?  Use the “reply” tool at the bottom of this post to share your advice with others!

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Keeping up with school during medical treatment

Going to school while living with a chronic illness, or while going through medical treatment, can be very tough for kids.

In this week’s new Kids4Kids video, patients from C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital talk about their experiences keeping up with school, and share tips for coping with missing some of the experiences that other kids are having during the school day.

Tell us:

What tips do you have for kids and teens missing school due to chronic illness or medical treatment?  Use the “reply” tool at the bottom of this post to share your experiences.

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Tips for teens on taking responsibility for your own healthcare

Many kids struggle with the realities of becoming an adult and needing to “own” your own healthcare, but for teens and young adults with chronic medical conditions, the responsibilities can be even greater.

In this week’s new Kids4Kids video, a group of our teen advisors from Mott Children’s Hospital share their tips for teens and young adults on how to take an active role in your healthcare as you prepare to take full responsibility as an adult.

Tell us:

What advice do you have for teens starting to take responsibility for their healthcare?  Use the comments tool at the bottom of this post to share your tips.

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Olympic Fun for Kids

Don’t just watch the Olympics, use them as an opportunity for fun and learning.

winter olympics fun for kidsEvery two years, families watch the Olympics and cheer on their favorite athletes and countries. This year we have the great fortune of having several Ann Arbor area, and even University of Michigan students, participating in the Olympics. Besides the fun and pageantry, the Olympics are a great opportunity to create some family time and learn a little something along the way.

Use Your Resources

There is no shortage of information about the Olympics online, check out these websites for background on athletes, results and even fun activities.

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30 years of caring for hearts

Mike Perlstein looks back after three decades of being one of the "Leaders and Best"

echo tech - mike perlsteinFebruary 7, 2014, marked the last day Mike Perlstein came to work at C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital.

Since he joined the University of Michigan Health System in 1980, Mike has been a welcome fixture in the Congenital Heart Center. While he is looking forward to the freedom retirement brings, he looks back on his time caring for hearts at Mott fondly. As part of our Heart Month series of blog posts, we caught up with Mike to talk with him about his 3-decade legacy with the Leaders and Best for kids.

Q. How did you get started in a healthcare career?

A. After three years of military service I worked for a time at a foundry in my hometown of South Haven, Michigan. But I had wanted to move back to Ann Arbor, which I eventually did in early 1974, landing a position in the Drafting Department of Space Physics Research Lab on our North Campus. During my four years there, a developing interest in firefighting led me, ultimately, to entry into an Emergency Medical Technician program. It was there that “the lights went on,” and I was drawn to this field where I thought I could do something that could make a difference.

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