Slower can be better

Reducing radiation exposure during heart catheterization procedures

cardiac cath reducing radiationA cardiac catheterization is a procedure performed by a cardiologist to diagnose and often treat heart conditions. Many patients with congenital heart disease require cardiac catheterizations. During catheterization procedures, we use fluoroscopy to obtain real-time moving images of your heart.

Fluoroscopy is basically a series of x-rays that are played very quickly. It’s similar to how movies work – when the still images are played back quickly, they produces a moving image.

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Finding better ways to compare pediatric heart care quality

comparing pediatric heart care qualityThe fields of pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery have come a long way. Today, conditions that were universally fatal as recent as 30 years ago can now be successfully treated, allowing children with congenital heart disease to thrive into adulthood.

However, we also know that there is much more work to be done to ensure that all children with heart disease have access to the highest quality care. One thing that is important is to be able to identify and learn from those hospitals with the best outcomes who are providing the highest pediatric heart care quality to children with heart disease.

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IBD and College: Do the two play nicely?

Inflammatory bowel disease and collegeCollege students across the country are well into their second semester, bunkered into dorms and libraries and riding out the winter weather. Hopefully, especially for those first-year students, the challenges of navigating school and managing priorities seem a little less daunting. After all, adjusting well to college life is critical for success in school and is closely tied to graduation rates. So, it should come as no surprise when I say that successful college adjustment has lifelong implications for career opportunities, earning potential and future successes.

While this transition is difficult for all students, students with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) — like Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis — can attest to added challenges, such as maintaining their treatment regimen, avoiding common infections, and adjusting to shared bathrooms.

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Sledding Safely

sledding with helmetAll that fluffy white snow just calls children of all ages out to the sledding hill. While sledding can be a great way to enjoy some fresh air and physical activity in the middle of winter, taking some safety precautions can help keep you on the sledding hill and out of the emergency department.

Since sledding season began this year, we’ve seen an uptick in sledding-related injuries in the ED. We typically see sledding-related head injuries, but we also see broken bones and soft tissue injuries. Follow these tips to keep your family sledding safely.

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What you need to know about measles

mott blog - measles symptoms preventionMeasles was declared eliminated from the U.S. in 2000, but in recent years we have seen measles reappear primarily as a result of people bringing the virus to the U.S. from other countries. During the last decade, we have seen approximately 100 cases of measles per year in the U.S. However, in 2014, there were 644 cases reported, and already this year there have been over 100 cases.  Many of this year’s cases are connected to a large, multi-state outbreak linked to an amusement park in California. To date, there has been one case in Michigan (an adult). With all the news stories about measles, it’s easy to be concerned, but knowing the facts can ease your mind.

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Secure your television and furniture to prevent tip-over accidents

Prevent TV and furniture tipoversAs you get ready for the big game on Sunday, take some time to walk around your house evaluating your furniture, televisions and appliances for tip-over risks — if a young child pulls or climbs on the object, is it secure or will it fall on top of the child? Every three weeks a child dies when a television tips over onto him or her and every 45 minutes a child is taken to the ER because of a television tip over accident. Scary statistics, but you can prevent these accidents from happening.

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