How to Tell a Loved One When It’s Time to Give Up the Keys

Advice for telling family members when it's time to stop driving

There are several skills necessary for “safe driving.” These include a good memory, sequencing skills Driving blogand the ability to dual task, just to name a few. Unfortunately, these cognitive abilities are also the ones most affected by Alzheimer’s disease and other related dementias.

Before deciding if a person is no longer a safe driver, it’s important to watch for some of the following signs:

  • Difficulty navigating familiar places, changing lanes, or making turns
  • Slowing down driving speed dramatically when having a conversation
  • Confusing the brake and gas pedals
  • Failing to observe traffic signals

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Two kinds of links – silver and historical – bring artist to UMHS

Hospital exhibit features works by daughter of pioneering neurosurgeon & granddaughter of pioneering architect

Betsy Lehndorff sets up her exhibit in the Gifts of Art gallery

Betsy Lehndorff sets up her exhibit in the Gifts of Art gallery

The U-M Health System’s Gifts of Art program presents an exhibition of sterling silver compositions with narrative style by Betsy Lehndorff, daughter of legendary U-M neurosurgeon Edgar Kahn and granddaughter of Albert Kahn, the architect whose firm designed U-M’s former Old Main Hospital, the current University Hospital and Hill Auditorium.

The work will be on display in the Gifts of Art Gallery in University Hospital’s Floor 2 Main Corridor through February 1.

Much of the work in Betsy Lehndorff’s exhibition is the result of a concentrated 30-day period of silversmithing in her garage studio on a lake in northeastern Michigan. Under the self-imposed pressure of the exhibition, her creativity went into full bloom as she designed and produced one piece after another.

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Mild memory & thinking issues: What works, what doesn’t?

U-M experts weigh the evidence to help doctors & patients navigate mild cognitive impairment

memory finger string blogFor up to one in five Americans over age 65, getting older brings memory and thinking problems– along with the embarrassment of not being as “sharp” as they once were, and the worry that it will get much worse.

They might just call it “getting older”. But officially, when memory or cognitive problems don’t interfere significantly with daily living, doctors call them mild cognitive impairment, or MCI.

What can be done to prevent or slow MCI? And how much should seniors fear that their thinking or memory problems will get much worse?

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Variety and expertise: the rehabilitation recipe that worked.

Paul was up to challenge and his abilities continue to improve.

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Paul continues to see improvements in his abilities and credits the skilled physicians and staff at U-M MedRehab.

The MedRehab program is celebrating 25 years of service. Paul and Joan Christensen shared how Paul was able to recover after an unexpected stroke put him in the hospital.

Paul: I had a stroke when I was 59. I was not a candidate for stroke, being a non-smoker who exercised regularly and was in good health, so it was definitely a complete surprise. The stroke resulted in left side paralysis and I was unable to walk at first. I was originally admitted to St. Joe’s Hospital in Pontiac, but I wanted to come back to Ann Arbor for outpatient care. U-M is our home hospital, and we wanted to come back to where our doctors were.

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Turkey… with a side of memory loss?

If older relatives at holiday gatherings show early signs of dementia, new research shows the importance of steering them to testing

Thanksgiving memoryAs you gather for Thanksgiving and winter holidays, you might notice that Grandma, Aunt Betty or Uncle Sal seems to struggle more with memory, or thinking, than she or he did last year.

Rather than chalk it up to normal aging, new U-M research suggests you might want to gently suggest they get it checked out by their doctor.

In fact, as many as half of seniors who have these symptoms have never had it checked out fully, new research finds. Dr. Vikas Kotagal, a U-M neurologist who led the new study, says families should encourage seniors with even early signs of memory loss to talk to their doctor.

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Honor “Mr. Hockey” by sharpening your stroke knowledge

Gordie Howe's severe stroke should remind all fans of what they can do to cut risk & respond quickly, says U-M Comprehensive Stroke Program doctor

Gordie Howe

Gordie Howe, at the December 2013 Bridgestone NHL Winter Classic in Detroit.

Hockey fans everywhere are sending their thoughts and prayers to Gordie Howe this week, as the legendary “Mr. Hockey” battles the effects of a stroke.

But there’s something more that all fans, and their loved ones, can do to honor Howe, says the head of the University of Michigan’s Comprehensive Stroke Program.

Take this time to play defense against a stroke, and know what to do when you or someone around you suffers one.

Eric Adelman, M.D., the U-M stroke neurologist who helps lead a U-M team that has the highest level of stroke accreditation in the U.S., took a moment to discuss what fans can do. Continue reading