My journey to motherhood: From disappointment and frustration to the family I always dreamed of

Mother’s Day has special meaning to Kristine who wasn’t sure whether she’d ever be able to have her own children before fertility treatment at U-M

Bowdell family

Kristine Bowdell with daughter Patty, 3 and husband Martin.

Every year, the commercials begin again. Moms in pajamas waking up to flowers, presents and breakfast in bed from their little ones. Mother’s Day – a recognition of the special relationship between mothers and children and a reminder of the one thing I wanted most for so long and wasn’t sure I’d ever have.

I never imagined not being a mom. Everything in my life stemmed from my love for children.

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Fertility options for women with cancer

women fertilityAs many as 15% of all couples have difficulty becoming pregnant or meet the definition for infertility, but for those undergoing treatment for cancer the number can be even higher. This post discusses fertility options for women with cancer. Men, you haven’t been left out, my September blog discussed your fertility options, so you haven’t been left out.

For women who are undergoing cancer treatments, experts recommend they wait at least one year after treatment ends to have a fertility evaluation. This time is needed to allow the body to recover and readjust to Continue reading

Fertility options for men with cancer

fertility optionsWhile the focus of this blog is on fertility for men with cancer, I have not forgotten about women. Female fertility options will be addressed next month, so ladies please stay tuned.

Infertility, or not being able to conceive or bear children, affects about 10% of the population. While that seems like a small percentage, infertility can disproportionally affect both men and women undergoing cancer treatments. Many of our standard therapies for treating cancer such as surgery, chemotherapy, radiation and hormone therapy can damage the Continue reading

Stem cells: Five years ago, this would have been impossible

A Q&A with Gary Smith, Ph.D., head of U-M’s human embryonic stem cell lab


Gary Smith, Ph.D., director of the U-M MStem Cell Lab, pulls a sample of stem cells, which are shared with researchers globally.

A recent New York Times article sheds light on the issue of discarding embryos that carry gene mutations. Families such as the one featured in the story who opt for in-vitro fertilization and preimplantation genetic diagnosis, and have embryos that they will not use due to genetic issues, are encouraged to donate them to the MStem Cell laboratory instead of discarding them.

Read more about the work the MStem Cell laboratory does below.

Five years ago, Michigan voters did something extraordinary for science. Today, Gary Smith, Ph.D.,and his team a the MStem Cell laboratory carry out the research that voters approved: coaxing human embryonic stem cells to grow and flourish so that medical researchers around the world can study diseases and normal cell function.

Smith sat down for an interview to explain what’s happening with this voter-approved work.

Q: So what exactly happens in this lab?

A: We derive and grow human embryonic stem cells, in a slow, meticulous process that takes Continue reading

Is there a link between polyps, breakthrough bleeding and getting pregnant?

ann arbor fertilityThe short answer is that we think pregnancy rates are improved when polyps that are found are removed. If a woman is planning to become pregnant, and we find a polyp as part of a fertility evaluation, we will remove it.

Polyps are on the list of things that can cause breakthrough bleeding during a woman’s cycle. Some other causes of breakthrough bleeding are fibroids and not ovulating regularly or well.

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Trying to get pregnant with a second child

ttcWhether getting pregnant the first time was easy or required assistance, there are many factors that influence your ability to get pregnant a second time.

If you are planning a pregnancy, please remember the importance of prenatal vitamins, eating well, and regular activity.

It is difficult to predict from a prior experience how long it might take you to get pregnant.  Your increased age and changing medical history can be factors. Changes in a woman’s ovaries, uterus, and tubes can make it easier or harder to get pregnant for the second time.

Here are some factors that can impact your ability to conceive:

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