Baseball, hot dogs, apple pie (and cancer): three healthy tips

baseball hotdog and applepieSummertime, especially around the 4th of July, means that people are out enjoying what many associate with being American. However, with that come risks for cancer and potentially side effects for those living with cancer. Here are three healthy tips for this holiday and the rest of the summer.

  • Stay out of the sun – this might be tough to do, so a good course of action is to limit your sun exposure, use sunscreen (30 SPF or higher) and wear a wide brim hat. Continue reading

Baseball, Hot Dogs, Apple Pie (and cancer)

Summertime, especially around the 4th of July, means that people are out enjoying what many associate with being American. However, with that come risks for cancer and potentially side effects for those living with cancer.

Here are 3 tips to stay healthy this holiday and the rest of the summer.

  • Stay out of the sun – this might be tough to do, so a good course of action is to limit your sun exposure, use sunscreen (30 SPF or higher) and wear a wide brim hat.
  • Stay hydrated – drinking plenty of water is the best way to fight dehydration. Other ways include eating foods that have a high water concentration such as watermelon, lettuce and yogurt.
  • Stay cool – make sure you wear clothing that is breathable, take cool showers at bedtime and consider jumping into a pool for a swim.

More information on beating the heat and enjoying your summer are available through the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

Please share with us what you do to manage during the hot summer months.

Facing breast surgery? Here are facts to consider.

Maria Lyzen, right, and Ruth Freedman lead the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center's Breast Cancer Advisory and Advocacy Committee.

Maybe you’ve heard the recent news reports discussing second surgeries for women with breast cancer.

It’s an important, but complicated topic. So what do you really need to know if you or someone you care about is diagnosed with breast cancer?

Most women diagnosed   with breast cancer will have surgery. Many choose to have breast-sparing surgery or lumpectomy rather than a mastectomy. A lumpectomy removes the cancer, along with a small amount of normal tissue that surrounds it.

New research has found that nearly 23% of women have a second surgery, called a re-excision. Re-excision may need to be done if the pathology report reveals that there are still cancer cells at or near the area where the breast cancer was removed. This is what is referred to as a positive margin. The goal of a re-excision is to reduce the risk of breast cancer returning in the future. Continue reading

After cancer diagnosis, U-M doctor gains new understanding for patients


Samuel Silver, M.D., Ph.D., a professor of internal medicine and an oncologist at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, talks about his bout with lymphoma and how it changed his understanding for patients with new cancer diagnoses. The video was produced by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, a consortium of 21 leading cancer institutes dedicated to improving the quality and effectiveness of care provided to patients with cancer. The U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center is a founding member of the NCCN.