Hitting the snooze button on hospital noise (Infographic)

UMHS10427ReduceHospitalNoise-v3Monitors. Alarms. Pagers. People. Hospitals can get as noisy as other places we hang out during the day and there’s a negative side to all that noise. Patients can’t sleep soundly and noise interferes with healing.

The University of Michigan Health System has established quiet hours and tested sound diffusion panels — similar to ones used in music rehearsal rooms — to reduce hospital noise. Look at a breakdown of how hospital noise compares to everyday sounds. Continue reading

Protecting our Littlest Victors

NICU celebrates 365+ days without a CLABSI

NICU central lineThere was a time when central line blood stream infections (CLABSI) were historically accepted as inevitable and the source of significant medical morbidity and costs.

Today, though, staff, patients and families at Mott are celebrating a remarkable achievement. Thanks to a focused team effort, the Nick and Chris Brandon Newborn Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital has gone more than one year without an infection.

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Huddle up for patient safety

Safety reporting at C.S. Mott Children's Hospital

Every morning at C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital, 40 to 50 people gather for our 15-minute safety huddle. It’s an opportunity for staff to share safety concerns that can range from equipment issues to challenging family situations with the potential to cause safety issues. It’s not the place where we solve the concerns, but it’s a place for concerns to be voiced and connections to be made so issues can be addressed. After the huddle, a quick email recap is sent out to more than 250 staff members.

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Standardizing medications to ensure patient safety

Patient Safety Spotlight - Medication StandardizationNot all medications are formulated by manufacturers in dosages appropriate for children. Pharmacies make those medications by compounding them — meaning they crush and dissolve the adult medication and suspend it in liquid in a dosage appropriate for the child’s size. The problem is that different pharmacies may compound the same medication at different concentrations — meaning a teaspoon of medication from one pharmacy may not be the same as a teaspoon of the same medication from another pharmacy.

Statewide study

We wanted to investigate the prevalence of compounding variability and create a solution that would decrease the potential for medication adverse events occurring due to inadvertent wrong doses being administered. Data was collected that identified 147 medications that are compounded for children and found that there were 470 different concentrations of those medications being made. The concentrations of which varied widely.

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