Pregnancy and Weight Gain

Eating for Two You

pregnancy weight gainSeems like the minute you discover you are pregnant, people start reminding you that you are eating for two and to take it easy. While decades ago that was the advice given to women (and is still what many of those around you may be saying), research has shown that a healthy diet, appropriate weight gain and staying active during pregnancy is the best approach for both you and your baby.

Guidelines for how much weight you should gain during your pregnancy were most recently updated in 2009. Continue reading

Pregnant and snoring? When to worry

Maternal snoring puts women at greater risk of health issues such as high blood pressure and poor delivery outcomes but how do you know if you need treatment?

BlogPregSo your partner tells you that in addition to all of the obvious physical changes from pregnancy, you have also started to snore.

Is it just another irritant on the list of pregnancy nuisances or a serious concern for your health and your baby’s health?

I’ve been studying the link between maternal snoring, obstructive sleep apnea, and mom and baby health for several years. My most recent study found that chronic snoring  (snoring before and during pregnancy) makes women 65 percent more likely to deliver small babies and more than twice as likely to have a C-section as non-snorers. This is true even after other known risk factors, such as obesity, are accounted for.

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Oh, how your body will change during pregnancy

wh blog - body changes during pregnancyIn addition to the obvious physical changes as your belly grows during pregnancy, what other surprises may your body have in store for you? Pregnancy is an exciting time, but often one filled with many questions — is my baby healthy, can I do this/eat that, and what the heck is happening to my body?

During your first trimester, you’ll probably feel tired, perhaps more tired than you’ve ever felt before. Get as much rest as you can. About 70 percent of women will also experience nausea or vomiting during their first trimester. Eating a balanced diet of bland foods can help. A great over-the-counter combination that has proven effective and safe in controlling nausea and vomiting is taking Unisom (or a generic version) and vitamin B6 before you go to sleep at night.

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Breastfeeding multiples — Yes, it can be done!

wh blog - breastfeeding multiplesWe all know that breast milk is best for babies, but when you have two, three, four or more babies, is breastfeeding possible? Yes, it is. It requires focus, dedication, planning and help.

Start right. Bring your babies to your breasts as soon as possible after they are born. If the babies are in the NICU or for some other reason unable to nurse immediately, start pumping and saving your breast milk. If your babies are born at under 34 weeks, they will need fortified milk. A mineral-rich supplement can be mixed with your breast milk and given with a bottle for two or three feedings each day, depending on what your doctor recommends.

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The opportunity of a lifetime: Providing care for the Hicks family quintuplets

University of Michigan’s team approach provides coordinated, comprehensive care for both mom and babies

Being a faculty member in the Division of the Maternal Fetal Medicine (MFM) at the University of Michigan means I have had the privilege of working with many amazing families and playing a part in this very important time in their lives.  My colleagues and I have spent our careers caring for women with pregnancies that for any number of reasons qualify them as being high risk.

Several months ago, we had the extraordinary honor of meeting Mr. and Mrs. Robert and Jessica Hicks and their family. Mrs. Hicks had learned she was pregnant with higher order multiples and was referred to our institution for the special level of care we provide for high risk pregnancies. Upon our initial consultation, we learned that Mrs. Hicks was not just pregnant with four babies, as they had previously been counseled, but rather five babies – quintuplets! Numerous ultrasounds, consultations, appointments, and eventually an inpatient hospitalization for Mrs. Hicks allowed our team to optimize the care that both she and her babies needed.

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Easing the Back-to-Work Transition for Breastfeeding Moms

wh blog - back to work breastfeedingYou’ve made the healthiest choice for your baby and are breastfeeding, but maternity leave is almost over and it’s time to get ready to go back to work. With a little planning and support, you can continue to breastfeed your baby. The earlier you can start planning the better, but it’s never too late to set up a good plan.

During Your Pregnancy

Talk with your manager/supervisor about your goal to continue breastfeeding when you return to work. The Affordable Care Act mandates that all employers with more than 50 employees provide mothers with babies younger than 12 months a reasonable break time and private place (other than a bathroom) to pump.

Do your homework on breast pumps. Some insurance companies cover the cost of purchasing a quality electric pump. If yours does not, investigate renting a pump. Quality, electric pumps are best. Less expensive, battery-operated pumps are not as effective and have been shown to diminish a mother’s milk supply.

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